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MickyB

First day tomorrow....

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MickyB

Hi all, 
Tomorrow marks the first day of running my own business. I have spent the last four months working a full time job whilst putting things in place to make this happen. What would your top three pieces of advice be for a new starter like me?

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Tuffers

1) Be confident that you can do it.

2) Take your time to get it right.

3) Be happy and look out for new customers while you're working. Knock on neighbours.

Oh and #4) keep warm, it's not getting much above 0 tomorrow.

 

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scottish cleaning service

aye, remember a balaclava and two pair of kooltouch gloves under your gloves. I buy a box of 100 from justgloves.co.uk £7 for 100 and they last for days, highly recommend them.

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Incheck

Wishing you the Best of luck! I would say
1, do a good job,
2, invest at least 40% of your takings back in to the business to start with, you can lower this at a later stage down the line. Nothing worse than having to dip into your own slice of the cake to pay for insurance & other bits and bobs.
3, don’t give up
4 - dont spend as you earn, tuck money away for when the work dries up, it does happen every now and again!


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Part Timer

Never leave a job that you don't think you've done properly. 

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Big sul

All ways ask yourself would I be happy to pay for the job I just done!!
Good luck [emoji106]

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mike007

Take your time to do a good job, working speed will come with experience.....and be polite to your customers, and say a hello or a bit chilly today etc, as your setting up or working to passers by (they may decide to get you to do their windows).

And Good luck.

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Dave85

Be polite as a happy window cleaner is what potential customers want to see if you are working on there street.

 

Take your time on any first cleans  and class them as an invesment bearing in mind that if you do a good job that could be a customer for life and  a £10 house on a monthly clean is an extra £120 per year for you.A good reputation goes along way in window cleaning so doing a decent job is vital.

 

As you are starting out drop it into conversation to as many people as you can that you have just started a window cleaning buisness. Its just a way of getting your name out there and its free😉

 

Good luck

 

 

 

 

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Green Pro Clean Ltd

Just ask yourself WWGD?

 

Yup you got it -- What would Gordon do? 

 

nintchdbpict000134736678-e1507624687944.thumb.jpg.3b4643fcc4ab9de0eb848043a09d7e7a.jpg

 

There's a reason he looks like a smug ba***rd and that's cause he's got all the Benjamins!  

 

Watching 1 episode of Kitchen Nightmares will teach you more about actual business management than a year in business school. 

 

You make think I gone off the rails but honestly once you get it you'll realise how simple it all is. 

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TolishAPurd

1)Don't tell anyone that it's your first day... if anyone asks, you've been doing it 2 years!

2) Don't do anything you don't planned doing for the rest of the time you're in the job... No extras, no 'canyoujusts', don't take forever on a house. Just clean, quick chat, and move on.

3) For every house you clean, drop a leaflet to the neighbours on each side.

4) Most important one of all...BE PROFITABLE!!! Listening to some people on here they sound like they are running a charity. The customers are not your friends, they are buying a service. The point of that service is for you to make money. Always remember that and don't undersell yourself. Keep the customer happy by doing a good job and being polite, but not at the expense of your profits.

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Nudel

This is what I've learnt the last two years since I started out by myself, in no particular order.

 

Once your business picks up and your book is starting to fill up, don't be afraid to increase prices and drop low paid or troublesome customers.

 

Never be the cheapest cleaner in town, but strive to be the best cleaner in town.

 

If you get all your quotes you need to increase your prices.

 

The messers aren't worth the trouble.

 

Don't lay awake in bed thinking about non paying customers, sometimes it's better to cut your losses and move on.

 

You are going to underprice a job every now and then, take is an opportunity to learn and always do top quality work.

 

When you are feeling down, think back to your previous job and the freedom you now can enjoy as a self employed cleaner.

 

The weekend is the weekend, you and your family will be better off if you don't talk and think about work all the time.

 

Schedule time for paperwork as you schedule time for cleaning. It's an integral part of your business and should be done regularly and orderly.

 

If you do pole and wfp work and have access to the insides, do go and check your craftsmanship from the inside every now and then. You will learn a lot and become more confident and see where you might need to be more meticulous.

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scottish cleaning service
19 minutes ago, Nudel said:

This is what I've learnt the last two years since I started out by myself, in no particular order.

 

Once your business picks up and your book is starting to fill up, don't be afraid to increase prices and drop low paid or troublesome customers.

 

Never be the cheapest cleaner in town, but strive to be the best cleaner in town.

 

If you get all your quotes you need to increase your prices.

 

The messers aren't worth the trouble.

 

Don't lay awake in bed thinking about non paying customers, sometimes it's better to cut your losses and move on.

 

You are going to underprice a job every now and then, take is an opportunity to learn and always do top quality work.

 

When you are feeling down, think back to your previous job and the freedom you now can enjoy as a self employed cleaner.

 

The weekend is the weekend, you and your family will be better off if you don't talk and think about work all the time.

 

Schedule time for paperwork as you schedule time for cleaning. It's an integral part of your business and should be done regularly and orderly.

 

If you do pole and wfp work and have access to the insides, do go and check your craftsmanship from the inside every now and then. You will learn a lot and become more confident and see where you might need to be more meticulous.

great info m8. I always clean the pvc doors and every cleaner I tell just laughs at me. The way I see it, what is the first thing a client notices? yes, their front door. I have even forgot to do the door sometimes but I have never had one complaint yet but I was cheap at the beginning, not any more, I know my worth. cheers m

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MickyB

Thanks for your input guys, it is much appreciated. 

 

It was a day of flyering for me today and I have picked up three new jobs already. 

 

Looking forward to the challenges ahead. 

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Dave85
8 minutes ago, MickyB said:

Thanks for your input guys, it is much appreciated. 

 

It was a day of flyering for me today and I have picked up three new jobs already. 

 

Looking forward to the challenges ahead. 

Good stuff👍 flyering is ok but have you tried canvasing ie knocking on doors as it is much more efective. Also are you window cleaning trad or have you invested in wfp.

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MickyB

Hi Dave,

I have invested in a wfp system.

I haven't tried canvasing but if it's effective I will give it a go.

What is the spiel you give to the person that opens the door when you canvass? I've got visions of getting the door slammed in my face :1f602:

 

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Part Timer
1 minute ago, MickyB said:

Hi Dave,

I have invested in a wfp system.

I haven't tried canvasing but if it's effective I will give it a go.

What is the spiel you give to the person that opens the door when you canvass? I've got visions of getting the door slammed in my face :1f602:

 

Might happen but is that worse than getting no reply from a flyer. At least if they to tell you to f*** off at least you know where you stand. 

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Clisty1989
3 minutes ago, MickyB said:

Hi Dave,

I have invested in a wfp system.

I haven't tried canvasing but if it's effective I will give it a go.

What is the spiel you give to the person that opens the door when you canvass? I've got visions of getting the door slammed in my face :1f602:

 

Keep it simple, "hi my name's xxxx, I'm working in the area this week and was wondering if you are looking for a window cleaner?". You'll either get a no, how much, or yes. 

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lbcleaningservices

Be your self and be happy happy
That's what i find the most important thing

Do a great job people soon talk

Be regular no one likes window cleaners who dont show up

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Dave85

I can only echo what clisty 1989 has said and also just keep it simple and be confident also it can be an idea to say you clean a few houses on the street as it will give the customer abit of reasurance if they beleive you are allready working in the area.

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MickyB

Ok cheers fellas I'm going to give it a go!

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Steve E

I've only had WFP for upper floors for about 3 months.

My tip is to be really careful around edges of frames as you can pick up small pieces of brick that get trapped in the stock of the brush.

If you don't notice and later move on to an awkward window where you don't have as much control, it is possible they you can knock the glass with the brush stock and scratch glass with the embedded piece of brick! This happened to me on my 3rd or 4th week of WFP.

Remedy..order and fit a brush bumper for £5.

Check brush head and bristles after every job.

Good luck!

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MickyB
34 minutes ago, Steve E said:

I've only had WFP for upper floors for about 3 months.

My tip is to be really careful around edges of frames as you can pick up small pieces of brick that get trapped in the stock of the brush.

If you don't notice and later move on to an awkward window where you don't have as much control, it is possible they you can knock the glass with the brush stock and scratch glass with the embedded piece of brick! This happened to me on my 3rd or 4th week of WFP.

Remedy..order and fit a brush bumper for £5.

Check brush head and bristles after every job.

Good luck!

Thanks for this info Steve, I am going to order my brush bumpers first thing in the morning and get into a habit of checking the head and bristles after each job. :1f44d:

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Gazz

1. Don't take anything to heart. I struggled with this to start with.

 

2. Don't slip into a bad routine. If you get up at 6am at your old job. Then get up at 6am for window cleaning. It's so easy to get into a bad routine. "Oh I don't have much work today I can do it tomorrow". Yes it can work, but it's not the right attitude.

 

3. Don't over complicate things/over think it. 

 

4. Be prepared to drop alot of customers. 

 

 

 

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strech

good luck for the future mate, It will soon warm up :1f609:

keep going

don`t be put off

you will get there.

Edited by strech

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mike007
On 2/12/2018 at 23:22, Gazz said:

1. Don't take anything to heart. I struggled with this to start with.

 

2. Don't slip into a bad routine. If you get up at 6am at your old job. Then get up at 6am for window cleaning. It's so easy to get into a bad routine. "Oh I don't have much work today I can do it tomorrow". Yes it can work, but it's not the right attitude.

 

3. Don't over complicate things/over think it. 

 

4. Be prepared to drop alot of customers. 

 

 

 

Totally agree,

Luckily personally am a early riser anyway.

 

Learnt not to over complicate or think too much about things (like using Moerman liquidators)

 

Dropping customers, usually because under priced in early days,or entrance problems(climbing over garage roofs etc).poor payers,area not generating enough other customers etc.

 

Every day we get better at this job technique wise,speed wise,method of work wise......realising it is a job that has to make us money.....not a hobby.

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