help setting up RO at new home

Discussion in 'Water Fed Pole Cleaning' started by petehughesy, Aug 9, 2016.

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  1. petehughesy

    petehughesy Active Member
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    Basically ive moved property and im now on a water meter and my water is very harsh so im thinking that long term RO is the way to go.
    Totally new to this side of wfp as ive always used DI.
    What is the most cost effective way of doing it?
     
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  2. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    If you follow C Rose Cleaning Services posts you will see lots of useful info from other posters as he is in the same position as you.

    Obviously you need to know how much water you need to produce a day based on how much you use. What's 'harsh' water btw?

    Have you space to store water? Did you need to process water quickly? Will you need more water in the near future if you are a growing business? etc, etc.
     
  3. petehughesy

    petehughesy Active Member
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    Well I roughly around 300ltr a day, by harsh I mean the water reading is high, 230ppm so using a di will cost to much I'm thinking.
    I have space for a tank outside, I just think long term RO is the way to go


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  4. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    R/o is definitely the way to go.

    A large number of us use old (clean) 1000 litre IBC tanks as storage and we pump/transfer the water we need for the day into our van/s. Clean used IBC tanks are not expensive to buy although transport will add to the cost. Most use a submersible or external pump to transfer water.
    Storing water does give you other options, such as being able to process water whilst you are out working and you will have extra water if you need it.

    R/O systems.
    You can choose to have a small r/o such as a 300 or 450GPD which will produce water very slowly. Our 450GPD took 28 hours to fill our IBC tank. Or you can go for a faster fill using a 4040 r/o which will take between 6 and 8 hours to fill an IBC tank at 50 psi water pressure. A 4040 is much more expensive.

    You will also need to provide for some sort of frost protection for your r/o in the winter. In the early days I had a 225 GPD r/o which I used to process water into my trailer overnight. It wasn't very successful and rather Heath Robinson. The r/o was outside connected to the back tap. As long as water was flowing through the r/o there was no issue with the unit freezing even in sub freezing temperatures. When it wasn't working it was stored in a plastic box inside. If an IBC tank is going to be standing outside, then some have chosen a black IBC tank as this reduces the growth of algae as it restricts sunlight.

    Our water was around 250 ppm at the tap before they relined the water pipes. The 450GPD used to produce pure at 4ppm, which was just low enough for cleaning windows. But we put our water through di to ensure its 0 ppm. We do this after r/o and before the IBC tank. This meant that when we had 3 vans drawing water they were all using pure water and we didn't need a di vessel on each van.

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  5. petehughesy

    petehughesy Active Member
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    Thanks for your reply, your information is exactly what I needed


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