Kangoo

Discussion in 'Water Fed Pole Cleaning' started by Joe, Oct 7, 2012.

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  1. Joe

    Joe Active Member
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    Anyone ever bolted a tank frame into a kangoo? I got one coming tomorrow, but I think the fuel tank could be in the way.

    It's a cleaning warehouse tank.

    Also do I want 2 square washers either side of floor & hammerite holes once I drilled em?

    Thanks

    Joe
     
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  2. david247

    david247 Banned

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    ohh please post some pics
    :)
     
  3. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    Hi Joe

    No I haven't, but you have the same problem as most small vans owners do. The fuel tank is usually situated underneath the van just infront of the rear axle.

    I'm not going to advise you what to do, as securing a tank to the back of the van has become a contentious issue.

    The first thing you need to do is the identify exactly where and how you are going to fit the tank, and much is this is down to the size of the tank you are going to fit. Then you need to find out exactly what is under the floor of your van and where it is.

    Your van is based on the people carrier as are both of our small vans (Peugeot Partner 800 LX and Transit Connect LWB). You will notice that the rear footwell of the people carrier has a plate over it on the van to keep the floor level. It will be possible (with a little difficulty) to get access to this space, usually from behind the rear seats to provide securing for the front of your tank using the bolts and spreader plates provided. (We found the space of the Transit Connect was smaller than the Peugeot Partner, so we needed to be fairly accurate with our drilling. You need to consider the movement on the drivers seat and back when positioning the tank, especially if you haven't a fitted bulkhead. You may also need to use a bit of engineering initiative if the spacer plates are too big. I would consider a length of 40mm X 6mm flat bar running the width of the van with holes drilled in the right place to make one large spreader plate, but only if you could get it in with limited access in some cases (we could do this with the Peugeot but not the Connect.

    The bolts at the back are going to be the issue, but this will depend on the size and shape the the tank. With both of our small vans we opted for 500 liter tanks and fitted them length ways. In both cases this brought the positioning of the back securing bolts past the diesel tank which made things a lot easier for access to bolt everything up.

    On both vans I also opted for a couple of small high tensile supporting bolts down the sides above the fuel tank. I carefully drilled holes through the floor above the tank (there will be a space between the top of the tank and the floor which can be utilised) and fitted NUTSERTS. I cut the bolts down to size so they wouldn't protrude much into the cavity. These bolts are just there to keep the sides of the tank frame from 'moving around' when the water tank is full.

    However, if you have a small tank and want to position it across the width of your van, then the only possibility of fitting it securely is to drop the fuel tank, which can only be done with the tank empty.

    Tip. Before fitting the tank in your van, fill it up with tap water and make sure that your outlet coupling on the tank doesn't leak. If I had to drop the fuel tank I would epoxy glue the spreader plates into place and use longer bolts head down so you have the threads and nut accessable from inside. The reasoning behind this is that if you have to remove your tank later for a short period, you don't want to have to drop the tank again to refit everything - yes the bolts will stick up into the cargo area, but that inconvenience is small.

    Most advise nowadays is that you must secure your bolts through the van chassis to make sure it is more secure in an accident. I have seen an installation where the owners have drilled holes right through the chassis rails of their van and bolted the tank frame to the chassis using spreader plates. I spoke to our local MOT inspector and he said that if he saw that he would fail the van on its test.
    I've also seen another installation where the guy put a length of 'U' channel across the underneath of the van straddling the chassis and bolted his tank to this.

    Grippamax, who are selling crash tested tanks apparently use square flat spreaded plates epoxyed to the van floor - it gives them a safety certificate for a head on smash a 30 mph so I guess thats good enough then - but I obviously can't take any responsibility for failures due to my suggestions - you fit the tank at your risk.
     
  4. Joe

    Joe Active Member
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    Thanks for taking the time to write that mate.

    Is the fuel tank easy to drop?

    Do most frames come with necessary spreader plates?
     
  5. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    It's jacking the van up high enough which is the issue. I don't know much about the kangoo, but the Berlingo is the filler pipe into the tank at the tank itself that needed to be removed, the breather pipe, and then unbolting the tank from its supports. One could also remove the screws holding the filler neck at the cap and dropping the whole lot down as one assembly, but they usually did the first method in the garage. It is better to lower the tank on a jack with a little help from an assistant. On the Berlingo or Dispatch we didn't need to remove the tank completely as you just needed to get your hand in. You must also check that you unclip the fuel pipes so you don't put any strain on them. On the Berlingo there wasn't an inspection cover plate inside the van so as you lowered the tank the pipework and wiring came with it.

    With anything to do with fuel, its important that the area is clean of all road muck as you don't want this getting into the fuel.

    I have no idea what the tank frame will come with as they will be different, but I'm sure they must have some type of spreader plate to fit under the floor.
     
  6. Joe

    Joe Active Member
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    Cheers again mate

    I need to get it working ASAP with no time to drop the fuel tank at the moment, think I will fit the tank frame front end only to stop it sliding forward, and then ratchet strap the rear to secure it further.

    Can't wait for it all to come so I can work out what I actually need :-(
     
  7. Masons

    Masons Guru
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    Aha, you ever think about checking for fitting before buying?

    I have a Kangoo, had to have engineers fit it as there's not only a large fuel tank but a lot of bits underneath near the drivers section.

    A friend of mine who used to fit tanks for facelift had a look and even he said go and get an engineer to look at it.

    You need to attach it properly remember. Don't scrimp to save cash and yet die in the next 40mph crash.
     
  8. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    I'm glad you have made this point
     
  9. Joe

    Joe Active Member
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    Its a very valid point you have made there.

    I had originally just planned to make up a frame out of key clamp like Vito did and use 3 Straps to secure it, however i was offered the frame at a good price so took it.

    I think it will be pretty safe to bolt down the frame as much as possible ( its going to be over half then frame) until i get time to go to the garage and get the fuel tank dropped, then ratchet strap the tank down as usual. The frame should have ample fixture to prevent any forward movement, and the straps should do the rest.
     
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