Swivel goose neck

Discussion in 'Water Fed Pole Cleaning' started by TWC, Apr 23, 2016.

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  1. TWC

    TWC Active Member
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  2. Marko067

    Marko067 Well-Known Member
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    I recently started using the Gardiner Q-loq one and have found it excellent, especially for getting your brush in the corners. Works very well on shorter poles 18'-22' but I haven't mastered it on longer poles. seems more difficult to keep the brush where you want it. However, I find I don't need it so much anyway on long reaches. Ground and first floor though real great.
     
  3. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    I prefer the angled swivel tbh. I have used both.

    I find its a love hate situation with me. The positives are that having a swivel brush gets into the corners easier from an angle (as per Marko067) and less bending. I also find that I don't move around as much whilst cleaning a window or french doors. I'm inclined to stay on one spot.

    The downsides are not being able to use the side of the brush to remove bird lime and when cleaning sills at an angle. These are the biggest issues for me.

    I have the swivel on the brush at the moment but I'm falling out of love with it at the moment. I'm surprised its been on as long as it has this time though (3 weeks).
     
  4. ♠Winp®oClean♠

    ♠Winp®oClean♠ Forum Addict
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    I'm a long time swiveller- approx 10 years:D IMO you're better off with the longer reach version. You want the swivel tension set so that the brush swivels freely but not so much that the brush flops to one side when lifted off the glass. As Spruce said, angled swivels are best but nobody as yet retails them. I believe Alex Gardiner maybe onto it though?
     
  5. Tuffers

    Tuffers Hero
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    I use a swivel and rate it. Can't get on with it at 30' + though as once it's flopped to the side I find it impossible to get the brush flat on the glass again without bringing the pole down. I find they need tightening every so often too to stop the flopping about.
     
  6. ♠Winp®oClean♠

    ♠Winp®oClean♠ Forum Addict
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    Yeah, worth pointing out that I only use them below 35ft also.
     
  7. TWC

    TWC Active Member
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    Thanks for the feedback. Only do a bit above the first floor so think I will give it a try. Just worth asking you knowledgeable lot rather than wasting another £10 + postage. Nobody mention any problems with it breaking so assume it's all good.
    Just playing with making a short wfp for ground floor windows out of a broom handle and was shocked at the different combinations on the gardiner site.
    Every day's a school day!
     
  8. TWC

    TWC Active Member
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    So that little bit of angle where it connects to the brush makes a lot of difference?
    Wonder why they don't make a square socket slightly angled as well then???
    Q Alex gardiner
     
  9. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    Or offer both in the same way as brush holders are - angled and 90 degrees.
     
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