wages

Discussion in 'Managing Your Business' started by mikey250976, Sep 30, 2015.

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  1. mikey250976

    mikey250976 Newcomer
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    Hi, I run a small business and took on my girlfriend to work with me 4 years ago, it has been going ok , all the money goes to the sane house.
    But she has bow fell pregnant, and Iam gonna need to employ someone else, probably someone over 18 anyway..
    My question is... what is a reasonable wage to give somebody these days,. As Iam out of touch with wages.
    Am better doing a percentage thing, or paying on a hourly rate, I used to do it on a percentage because I thought it was better than by the hour, because if it rains and you sit about for a while you end up out of pocket.
    Any suggestions would be appreciated

    Mikey
     
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  2. boarcity

    boarcity Guest

    which ever way you do it [% or hourly] youre going to have to make sure the worker gets a decent whack EVERY week or theyll move on. that means if your paying a % and its a week of rain the following week youre goin to have to work long days,double bubble.
    iv always paid hourly and to make that pay means working in all weathers . i pay 7 quid per hour with a guaranteed minimum of hours plus i round up the hours if we go over the minimum [ ie if we go over by ten minutes they get a full hours pay extra .

    hope that helps
     
  3. daveyboy

    daveyboy Legend
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    I was working for a guy nearly 10 years ago for £10 an hour
    Doing £20 an hour of work so that was a win win situation
    Depends whether he will be working with you on say £8 an hour or working on his own earning you both a tenner an hour each
     
  4. adamangler

    adamangler Wakefield Window Warrior
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    Suppose it depends where you are in country. Earning a tenner an hour up here is a very respectable wage whatever job you are doing (assistant manager at where i work is on £9.50).

    Id say minimum wage or just above, its a low skilled labour intensive job.
     
  5. daveyboy

    daveyboy Legend
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    Minimum wage you will get no loyalty
    Good wage and never discuss what the customer pays and someone is likely to stay and work hard
     
  6. boarcity

    boarcity Guest

    employee insurance and organizing their tax and NI is something you need to do from day 1 . work clothing /shoes as well . tools , squeegee rubber for the employee

    first aid kit
     
  7. adamangler

    adamangler Wakefield Window Warrior
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    you never know, theres people who want jobs and will work hard for it, ive worked for minimum wage or not much more for last 15 years and thats only 3 different jobs so people are prepared to work for minimum wage.
     
  8. Green Pro Clean Ltd

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    I gave you a disagree there Adam as you are obviously not anymore, you are moving up the ladder so to speak and taking positive actions to increase your income.

    I have been the employee route and don't much care for it. This time round the lad I have is a sub-contractor. I say I need you Wednesday & Thursday next week and he says yes or no, (it is always yes but he has the option to decline)

    Why this works so well is that we have a sub-contractor agreement that there are no 'guaranteed' hours but I agree to give him first dibs on all the hours that are available. There is also a hell of a lot less paperwork.

    He is registered as self employed with the tax office so he provides me with his UTR number for my accounting records, then on a Friday he gives me and invoice for the hours worked for the week, say 20 hours and I pay him out £200 cash there and then (yes he is on £10 per hour)

    He is responsible for his own taxes and NI, and I have already checked with Martin at Gleaming when I renew my policy my public liability will also cover subs.

    For larger jobs, for example, we have been asked to totally strip/weed a large garden area, lay membrane and then gravel it over he goes and takes a look and then gives me a 'piece work' price start to finish.

    As he is not my 'employee' he is free to freelance for other tradesmen and does on occasion but always gives me priority as I don't mess him about, I pay him promptly and there is the unwritten rule he doesn't help others on 'my turf'

    All in all a rather tidy arrangement as neither of us feel any obligation, more of a coalition in the working dynamic.

    Hope that waffle helps somehow.
     
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