windows with wood trim running across

Discussion in 'Water Fed Pole Cleaning' started by Dragbag, Sep 28, 2016.

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  1. Dragbag

    Dragbag Active Member
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    apologies for the description (windows with wood trim running across and vertically on the outside ) i don't know what they are called:cool: like theses Exterior Wood Trim Repair in New Jersey - Monk's

    what is the bet way to clean them with out getting streaks?? is there a technique, or just scrub scrub...rinse:whistle:
     
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  2. gwindows

    gwindows Member
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    scrub rinse and you won't go wrong :D:D
     
  3. select window cleaning

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  4. PJ Bullard

    PJ Bullard Active Member
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    These are dreaded! Especially the crappy old wooden windows which flake off pieces of wood when you clean them. Sliding sash are the worst. Just take extra time on them and use a small squeegee and applicator to aviod touching the frames and splintering your equip
     
  5. Nudel

    Nudel Member
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    I wfp a lot of these, once you have them cleaned properly you can call clean them as every other window. For first cleans it sometimes help to do the top row first and let the wood drip off somewhat before cleaning the next row.
     
  6. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    As a suggestion you also need to do a search on the internet and learn what the most common/basic styles of windows/frames are called.
    Eg. Bay window, sash window, georgian window, etc.

    Perhaps going one step further and learn what the key components are called.

    Eg, top frame, transom bar, sill etc.

    This does help to install a little confidence in customers that you do know what you are doing even although you are new to window cleaning. ;)
     
  7. Dragbag

    Dragbag Active Member
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    yea i should... funny i use to be an aluminium fabricator ( made d/g :eek:) was just going brain dead... any way i cleaned them, just the fronts on this house...rinsed real well. then the heavens opened up about 5 mins after i was off the job:whistle: got paid though..
     
  8. spruce

    spruce Grand Master
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    For your own piece of mind and confidence, my suggestion is to go back and check them and rectify any issues. We still do a block of flats that have wooden sash windows. It took 3 cleans to get them right. A couple of years later they were repainted and it took us another 3 cleans before they came right again.

    We also do a pub and their sash windows are in a dreadful state. I do all the tops first and then the bottoms. I also find that I create less issues for myself with a quick brush and rinse unless I have to focus on a bit of bird lime.

    The best way we found has already been posted on this thread. Do the tops, let them drip off and then do the bottoms. There are 2 problems with these windows.

    The first is the section of glass at the top of the bottom pane that tucks up behind the bottom frame of the upper window. You need to get your brush bristles into the gap to clean it and rinse without deluging the inside with water as some do leak.

    The second is the underneath of that lower window frame. If you don't get the dirt off that then any splash during rinsing can drip dirty water onto the lower glass pane. I usually run the edge of the brush up against that lower frame's bottom edge with squirting water directly at it.

    I also find that reducing the flow works better. I use 3 on my Varistream which is the only time I use that setting.

    .
     
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