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Rinsing on the glass


Kenny Q

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So what gardiner brush heads for cleaning on the glass as thought it be handy for the narrow alleyways between houses where people might have a loft room window and its too narrow to step back and look if that makes sense.

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1 hour ago, Spit & polish said:

So what gardiner brush heads for cleaning on the glass as thought it be handy for the narrow alleyways between houses where people might have a loft room window and its too narrow to step back and look if that makes sense.

Gardiner Dupont Tapertec Hybrid, with 100 degree fan jets and a short swivel. Scrub the top frame and vent if there is one over and back at least twice. Then the left frame and glass edge vertically two or three times. Continue across with vertical agitations and finish vertically with the right frame and edge of glass. It's quicker for maintenance washes to do the frame and glass as one process than it is to do all the framework and then the glass as two separate phases. Couple of swipes across any other horizontal frames and the sill to loosen the dirt crust on the sill and allow the water in.

To rinse, twist the pole to change the brush orientation to on its side. Swipe across and back twice to build a head of water at the top of the glass but not disturbing the top frame. Bring the brush down one level, swipe across once. Bring it down one level and swipe back once. Continue to the bottom of the window (descending wiper blade). A couple of swipes across the sill to finish with the brush in vertical, horizontal or angled orientation to your preference with a twist of the pole. Often now in side alleys I do the whole process with the brush on edge and instead of vertical agitation on the glass I do the agitation as well as the rinse as a descending cross and back wiper blade. That's my preference. I do very little scrubbing except for the frames and sills on first washes. Other guys will have their own preferences for equipment technique and style. Rightly so.

This is the equipment and basic method I've settled on. Most windows are done in 15 to thirty seconds or so in a maintenance wash. If you are in the early stages though don't be in a hurry. Concentrate on quality. Speed will follow in time.

Edited by Davy G
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I did my first window in an alley on Monday (actually first custy 🙂 ) I was using Supreme Dupont Tapertec Hybrid with swivel gooseneck and pencil jets. I did like the way the swivel allowed me not to be directly under the window so I didn't get soaked 😂

My findings so far are that swivels are great in some circumstances but if you really need to scrub on a first clean then a non swivel is better but that's just my novice opinion. 

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43 minutes ago, ched999uk said:

I did my first window in an alley on Monday (actually first custy 🙂 ) I was using Supreme Dupont Tapertec Hybrid with swivel gooseneck and pencil jets. I did like the way the swivel allowed me not to be directly under the window so I didn't get soaked 😂

My findings so far are that swivels are great in some circumstances but if you really need to scrub on a first clean then a non swivel is better but that's just my novice opinion. 

Swivel won't swivel on a straight in front window unless you ask it to, no matter how much pressure you apply.

The only time you shouldn't use a swivel is on FSG cleans

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2 minutes ago, Part Timer said:

Swivel won't swivel on a straight in front window unless you ask it to, no matter how much pressure you apply.

The only time you shouldn't use a swivel is on FSG cleans

Thanks. It will be down to my lack of practical hands on. I guess I am twisting my wrists when I shouldn't be. More practice required I think. 

Thanks for the explanation. 

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Just now, ched999uk said:

Thanks. It will be down to my lack of practical hands on. I guess I am twisting my wrists when I shouldn't be. More practice required I think. 

Thanks for the explanation. 

Possibly try without a swivel, get the basic technique and once mastered then try the swivel. @Ian Docksey watched me and mentioned the swivel and I hadn't realised I'd actually used it. Once mastered it's almost becomes like fanning on traditional cleans.

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10 minutes ago, ched999uk said:

Thanks. It will be down to my lack of practical hands on. I guess I am twisting my wrists when I shouldn't be. More practice required I think. 

Thanks for the explanation. 

I'd recommend starting without a swivel as you'll gain a better feel of the brush pressure on the glass.

When using a swivel for the first time you'll find your energy input is far greater as your wrists and forearms will ache lots due to over effort.

 

A great point from Part timer about not using a swivel on FSG as you'll not be able to keep the brush head on the gutters and soffits because it will walk off and there's a chance you can knock the guttering off of snap brackets because you'll be fighting the pole

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@Part Timer

 Is onto something about it being easier to work with a swivel when it's not directly in front of you. It does work easier if it's slightly to your side. Another thing is to get used to changing the orientation by gently twisting the pole rather than trying to force it by pressing hard. This is a bit counter intuitive but play about with it and it will become second nature. I agree totally the swivel is not good for fsg cleaning.

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I have been using a swivel for must be about 15-18 months now and still have mixed feelings about them. If working to one side of a window they are good but when trying to do sills and door frames I do find they can turn when you dont want them  to ,also when scrubbing stubborn dirt with the end bristles they arnt the best . They arnt any good for gfs cleans , I think it’s a personal thing I could take them or, leave them in equal measure . 

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9 hours ago, Pjj said:

I have been using a swivel for must be about 15-18 months now and still have mixed feelings about them. If working to one side of a window they are good but when trying to do sills and door frames I do find they can turn when you dont want them  to ,also when scrubbing stubborn dirt with the end bristles they arnt the best . They arnt any good for gfs cleans , I think it’s a personal thing I could take them or, leave them in equal measure . 

Once you get the hang of them they are easy to control. To stop them turning when you don’t want them to just needs a bit more control of twisting the the pole the opposite way to which the swivel wants to go. It’s like turning into a skid when driving a car. A little counter twist pressure will control the swivel and prevent the turn before it happens. 

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