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trevor peacock

Why rinsing is not always necessary



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scottish cleaning service
2 minutes ago, Part Timer said:

The theory is if you have a high enough flow rate you'll be rinsing as you wash. 

 

I see, I just want to know where the dirt finally ends up. As I don't WFP I am intrigued to find out as I will be doing it soon. I always practice on my own windows so I will find out. What's the flow rate number? A litre a minute?

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Part Timer
4 minutes ago, scottish cleaning service said:

litre a minute?

Don't know as I personally don't do it

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Nudel

Since I was the one who mentioned Darrens video and have applied the principle of it with good results in the year since he posted it; I'll share my technique.

 

As you know I live on an island with harsh weather conditions.

 

First it comes down to the weather the last few days. Any rain is good as it cleans the windows. Wind and no rain is bad as it builds up salt and muck.

 

Then it depends on how and where the window is located. Under an awning it needs thoroughly rinsing. If it's recessed into the wall, it needs rinsing. If it's in the direct path of the rain, and it rained recently, it's most likely not that dirty.

 

Third it's about how long since last clean.

 

See where I'm going with this?

 

If I conclude it's not that dirty I do a few sweeps of the top frame. One quick not very precise agitation, then go back up and rinse on glass in a sweeping motion (with swivel) and move the dirt down.

No I can't do  it completely rinse free where I live, but the principle Darren mentions in his video saves a lot of time compared to the two agitations and rinsing off glass that have been advocated.

 

As others have said, add up the factors and clean away. If you do the job in half the time, you have time to wait for a few minutes and check out the windows for runners. Sometimes you misjudge and have to clean the entire job twice, but other times you do it in half the time. It evens out in my favour so far.

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dmw
Since I was the one who mentioned Darrens video and have applied the principle of it with good results in the year since he posted it; I'll share my technique.
 
As you know I live on an island with harsh weather conditions.
 
First it comes down to the weather the last few days. Any rain is good as it cleans the windows. Wind and no rain is bad as it builds up salt and muck.
 
Then it depends on how and where the window is located. Under an awning it needs thoroughly rinsing. If it's recessed into the wall, it needs rinsing. If it's in the direct path of the rain, and it rained recently, it's most likely not that dirty.
 
Third it's about how long since last clean.
 
See where I'm going with this?
 
If I conclude it's not that dirty I do a few sweeps of the top frame. One quick not very precise agitation, then go back up and rinse on glass in a sweeping motion (with swivel) and move the dirt down.
No I can't do  it completely rinse free where I live, but the principle Darren mentions in his video saves a lot of time compared to the two agitations and rinsing off glass that have been advocated.
 
As others have said, add up the factors and clean away. If you do the job in half the time, you have time to wait for a few minutes and check out the windows for runners. Sometimes you misjudge and have to clean the entire job twice, but other times you do it in half the time. It evens out in my favour so far.
I always rinse off. I always think if your works well priced and especially if the customer is in just take your time and give them their moneysworth and you know the job is done to the best of your ability.

Sent using the Window Cleaning Forums mobile app

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scottish cleaning service

I should have watch Darren's video and will do when I begin WFP. Anyway, off today and going to do some leafleting after a bank visit. I'm taking it easy after working so hard. :1f603:

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RWCleaning

Well the word ‘clean’ is subjective/relative.

What might be clean to someone by giving a window a quick scrub and no rinse, might not to be clean to someone else who scrubs slightly more & does one thorough rinse after.

 

I tried the no rinse method on a house yesterday, customer wasn’t in and I had a little spare time. As it was drying I could see small blacks specs on the frames & one big spec of dirt/or bit of leave at the bottom of the glass pane when I stood right back. A quick rinse would of got them all off. So I did afterwards.

 

Some cleaners may just shrug their shoulders and say it’s fine, it’ll dry fine etc. But maybe I am a perfectionist. But I’ll continue doing it the way that got me this far.

 

each to their own.

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Den
6 hours ago, spruce said:

 

Obviously where you are in the country and frequency of clean are very important factors.

 

For us, on the coast, I'm not confident with rinsing this way either. The trouble is that unless we move out of our comfort zone and try new methods we will never find new ways of doing window cleaning.

 

Totally agree I'm always open to anything that helps wear and tear on our bodies and also saves time as long as it don't compromise our standard of work. 

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paul alan

On our lunch today I saw a window cleaning van pull up across the road behind us, me being nosy turned the van around to watch.

 

Shocking...fixed brush head doing windows from an angle...no corners or frames and not anything that resembled a rinse. Just a quick scrub.

 

Was good really as I had my new guy with, a great example of how not to do it. I have no idea of what kind of mindset these guys have, it made the green pro video look OCD.

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P4dstar
1 hour ago, paul alan said:

On our lunch today I saw a window cleaning van pull up across the road behind us, me being nosy turned the van around to watch.

 

Shocking...fixed brush head doing windows from an angle...no corners or frames and not anything that resembled a rinse. Just a quick scrub.

 

Was good really as I had my new guy with, a great example of how not to do it. I have no idea of what kind of mindset these guys have, it made the green pro video look OCD.

If you could stop stalking me that would be great 😂

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Nicky
On 08/11/2018 at 18:22, steve garwood said:

Freedom of speech mate. We can see what your getting at.

If you think pro green doe’s a bodge job just say it 🎣

I didn’t say that pro green does a bodge at all

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P4dstar
3 minutes ago, Nicky said:

I didn’t say that pro green does a bodge at all

Yeah but you didn't say he doesn't either 😂😂

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Green Pro Clean Ltd
10 hours ago, RWCleaning said:

Well the word ‘clean’ is subjective/relative

 

No, it's not.  Clean is clean, something is either clean or it isn't clean.   Some may consider 'clean enough' and then it can be subjective but without the word 'enough' there is only clean or not clean. 

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steve garwood
11 hours ago, Nicky said:

I didn’t say that pro green does a bodge at all

Banter mate, banter 😘

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RWCleaning

Well safe to say there’re some opinions on this subject. 

 

I do genuinely believe @Green Pro Clean Ltd And others who say they don’t always rinse on some windows and they come out fine. I wasn’t accusing anyone here of ‘cowboy cleaning’

 

I have mostly 8 weekly rounds, so personally I don’t think I can get away with it, as they all are quite dirty etc, but I have a couple of 6 weekly rounds as well, some aren’t too dirty when I show up, I will continue to practice when I have a little spare time & customer is out.

 

 Thanks for the tips & advice about potential faster ways. 

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