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Booster pump position and more?


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Hi guys, looking to place a small booster pump on my system but I'm unsure as to the best placement of it. 

Is there a particular place it should be put or is it personal preference? 

I was also wondering if I could wire it into the loop of my float switch to turn it of when the float switch activates my cut off solenoid. 

I have water in..... Solenoid.... Pre filters... Ro's... Di resin..... Tank

 

Thanks in advance

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It can be sited either before the pre-filters or between the filters and the RO. I've had mine set up both ways and can't say I've seen any difference in production. However, the reason I moved it to between the filters and RO was because it produces 80-100 psi. My mains is only about 40 psi. The recommendation of my RO manufacture was to only hand tighten my pre-filters. When I fitted it before the pre-filters it blew out all the seals unless I tightened them so tight I struggled to get them undone again. If you fit it between the prefilters and RO then this issue is not a problem. 

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8 minutes ago, Marko067 said:

It can be sited either before the pre-filters or between the filters and the RO. I've had mine set up both ways and can't say I've seen any difference in production. However, the reason I moved it to between the filters and RO was because it produces 80-100 psi. My mains is only about 40 psi. The recommendation of my RO manufacture was to only hand tighten my pre-filters. When I fitted it before the pre-filters it blew out all the seals unless I tightened them so tight I struggled to get them undone again. If you fit it between the prefilters and RO then this issue is not a problem. 

Makes good sense, cheers

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2 hours ago, Baldmonkey said:

Hi guys, looking to place a small booster pump on my system but I'm unsure as to the best placement of it. 

Is there a particular place it should be put or is it personal preference? 

I was also wondering if I could wire it into the loop of my float switch to turn it of when the float switch activates my cut off solenoid. 

I have water in..... Solenoid.... Pre filters... Ro's... Di resin..... Tank

 

Thanks in advance

Have you sourced a booster pump? The other thing is the microswitch in a float switch is usually just a reed switch which won't carry much current as it only has to operate a solenoid valve.

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52 minutes ago, spruce said:

Have you sourced a booster pump? The other thing is the microswitch in a float switch is usually just a reed switch which won't carry much current as it only has to operate a solenoid valve.

I've not sourced a pump yet but was looking at using the float switch to break the negative ring of the circuit. But again I might be barking up the wrong tree

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48 minutes ago, Baldmonkey said:

I've not sourced a pump yet but was looking at using the float switch to break the negative ring of the circuit. But again I might be barking up the wrong tree

It doesn't matter if you break the negative or positive they carry the same current. You might need the float switch to activate a relay to shut off pump. 

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I have a Machine Mart float switch to control my r/o with a 230v normally closed solenoid valve @Baldmonkey. I have been brought to task about using 230v rather than 12v. I accept that but do have the garage on earth leakage. As the float switch is the same type as used in 230v submersibles I decided do go with this option. 

This system has now been in operation for 13 years without issue.

https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/float-switch-230v-2m-cable/

This float switch can either be used to fill or empty an IBC tank. There is a wiring diagram in the box on how to wire it up for either application.If memory serves me the switch is rated at 10amps.

The float switch pivots on a 300mm length of conduit with 2 cable glands through a hole in the top of my IBC tank.

 

You have 3 x 3013 membranes. (I had to find your static system video.) You are going to have to seek advice about a suitable booster pump.

When Gardiners sold booster pumps they sold one booster pump for the PRF, 4021 and 4040. But Doug Atkinson says they need different booster pumps. I'm guessing that 3 x 400gpd membranes = 1200gpd has a similar production rate of a 4021. There are a lot of suppliers that have a suitable booster pump if my assumption is correct. ie Water Genie and Daqua. You will be able to control those booster pumps with this Clarke float switch.

But my question is this. If it takes your r/o setup 12 hours to fill a 1000 IBC tank, why are you considering a booster pump?

 

Float switch 002a.jpg

float switch instructions pg1.jpg

Float switch instructions pg2.jpg

Edited by spruce
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1 hour ago, ched999uk said:

It doesn't matter if you break the negative or positive they carry the same current. You might need the float switch to activate a relay to shut off pump. 

You are right,  but putting the switch on the negative means the current is 'softened' by the electric motors windings so tends to be more gentle on the switch's contacts. If the switch won't handle the current then it won't last either way. However, its best to switch the positive as the motor won't be 'live' as it will be if the negative is switched.

Most power tools these days use double pole switches, so they switch both negative and positive. This is required as the Europeans use a Schuko plug system which can be plugged in either way.

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1 hour ago, spruce said:

I have a Machine Mart float switch to control my r/o with a 230v normally closed solenoid valve @Baldmonkey. I have been brought to task about using 230v rather than 12v. I accept that but do have the garage on earth leakage. As the float switch is the same type as used in 230v submersibles I decided do go with this option. 

This system has now been in operation for 13 years without issue.

https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/float-switch-230v-2m-cable/

This float switch can either be used to fill or empty an IBC tank. There is a wiring diagram in the box on how to wire it up for either application.If memory serves me the switch is rated at 10amps.

The float switch pivots on a 300mm length of conduit with 2 cable glands through a hole in the top of my IBC tank.

 

You have 3 x 3013 membranes. (I had to find your static system video.) You are going to have to seek advice about a suitable booster pump.

When Gardiners sold booster pumps they sold one booster pump for the PRF, 4021 and 4040. But Doug Atkinson says they need different booster pumps. I'm guessing that 3 x 400gpd membranes = 1200gpd has a similar production rate of a 4021. There are a lot of suppliers that have a suitable booster pump if my assumption is correct. ie Water Genie and Daqua. You will be able to control those booster pumps with this Clarke float switch.

But my question is this. If it takes your r/o setup 12 hours to fill a 1000 IBC tank, why are you considering a booster pump?

 

Float switch 002a.jpg

float switch instructions pg1.jpg

Float switch instructions pg2.jpg

hi spruce and thanks for the link and useful info, ill have a nosey at everything, blow a few things up, melt a few wire until i have the right setup...lol

The change in setup isnt related to how much i need to produce rather than tds out of the ro's, over time i think my membranes have suffered due to running on static pressure. This has led to an increase in resin consumption and at current prices thought id better have a look at what can be done to reduce my tds.

unfortunatley for me i live in an area the regularly sees 350 tds so its imperative im strategic with my setup.

so ive been watching a lot of videos and have come noticed that output tds can be a direct correlation to the prssure used in the system and NOT just the tds input.

 

ill let you know how many times i fuse/melt things

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4 hours ago, Baldmonkey said:

hi spruce and thanks for the link and useful info, ill have a nosey at everything, blow a few things up, melt a few wire until i have the right setup...lol

The change in setup isnt related to how much i need to produce rather than tds out of the ro's, over time i think my membranes have suffered due to running on static pressure. This has led to an increase in resin consumption and at current prices thought id better have a look at what can be done to reduce my tds.

unfortunatley for me i live in an area the regularly sees 350 tds so its imperative im strategic with my setup.

so ive been watching a lot of videos and have come noticed that output tds can be a direct correlation to the prssure used in the system and NOT just the tds input.

 

ill let you know how many times i fuse/melt things

The Ebay link to the membranes on your r/o video isn't working any longer so I don't know what membranes you are using. You may have also just flagged that link up as an example of the membrane you use. But the link to the housing from Direct Water Filters is still active.

It reminds me that there are membranes and then there are membranes. Companies such as Direct Filters supply r/o's which mainly cater for the drinks and Aquatic industries. The membranes they sell are cheap units which work perfectly well for the industries they supply to. In other words a membrane for these industries doesn't need to be that efficient. Its efficiency can also drop off quite quickly without causing too much of an issue. They are also cheap to buy so the initial cost of the r/o is less than someone selling USA manufactured membranes which are considered excellent quality. (Direct Water do say their membranes are made in the States. I haven't seen window cleaning application on their website at all.)

For window cleaning we need quality membranes that remove as many impurities in the water as possible. If our membranes don't work efficiently or their efficiency quickly drops off then its going to cost us in resin usage.

With a high tds your membranes can't be expected to last for many years. They will have a reduced life span. Its all to do with the economies of scale.

 

Edited by spruce
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