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Different types of window?


Bongofish

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Hello all! 

I know there will be different types of windows and glass. And I know since I've been doing this 4-5 months and grown a customer base of 160+ a month people may shoot me down for asking. But on some windows I can get a really good waterfall effect while rinsing and these seem to dry spotless. However some just seem to instantly separate the water and leave lots of little water drops on the window once cleaned and the 3 call backs I've had have all been these types of window. I feel like I can't rinse them anymore and I obviously can't hang about to see how they dry but just wondering if there is another technique I should be using on this type? 

I had a big job on today, guttering, facias windows, conservatory roof and all conservatory and it looked great when I left. And she was very pleased however when dried there were two windows that had mucky drip marks down them. I thought I had gave everything enough a rinse. All I can presume is that it's very windy here today and any mucky water from gutter or facias that's dropped when I want has blown onto the windows. I obviously work my way. Down and did the facias and guttering and let them dry as much as I could first before working on the windows. 

Just basically wondering if there is a different technique to use on different window types or if anyone else gets the same? 

I went straight back and cleaned them again and she now says they look fine, but all my 3 call backs have been them type of windows 🤷

Just to add the windows and frames were really bad and look like they hadn't been cleaned in years and thought there's no way in a million years she would have any complaints as everything was spotless and bright white....

Edited by Bongofish
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4 hours ago, Bongofish said:

Hello all! 

I know there will be different types of windows and glass. And I know since I've been doing this 4-5 months and grown a customer base of 160+ a month people may shoot me down for asking. But on some windows I can get a really good waterfall effect while rinsing and these seem to dry spotless. However some just seem to instantly separate the water and leave lots of little water drops on the window once cleaned and the 3 call backs I've had have all been these types of window. I feel like I can't rinse them anymore and I obviously can't hang about to see how they dry but just wondering if there is another technique I should be using on this type? 

I had a big job on today, guttering, facias windows, conservatory roof and all conservatory and it looked great when I left. And she was very pleased however when dried there were two windows that had mucky drip marks down them. I thought I had gave everything enough a rinse. All I can presume is that it's very windy here today and any mucky water from gutter or facias that's dropped when I want has blown onto the windows. I obviously work my way. Down and did the facias and guttering and let them dry as much as I could first before working on the windows. 

Just basically wondering if there is a different technique to use on different window types or if anyone else gets the same? 

I went straight back and cleaned them again and she now says they look fine, but all my 3 call backs have been them type of windows 🤷

Just to add the windows and frames were really bad and look like they hadn't been cleaned in years and thought there's no way in a million years she would have any complaints as everything was spotless and bright white....

When I first started doing retail contracts and shop fronts it was a nightmare to get water sheeting

I ended up buying Facelift rinse bars which actually helped.

Most in the trade will say "you just need good flow" but it didn't always work. 

I found using rinse bars and good flow together worked. Tried fan jets pencil jets and then rinse bars.

domestic windows were easy compared to retail windows 

 

And a funny reply to the thread heading title haha 🤣

 

Did you ever watch Play school ? 

 

playschool windows 1970.png

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I clean all types of window: domestic, commercial, church and shop, and all types of glass: phobic, phylic, leaded, Georgian. Have done for six and a half years. I use the same type of brush (extreme sill) and the same type of jets (100 degree fans). Never seen the need for a rinse bar, I can't see it doing anything that fan jets won't do. I can't recall a window I couldn't clean successfully. I use the same general technique. After cleaning the frames I use vertical agitations overlapping as I cross the glass to wash. Descending curtain of water to rinse down, with the brush lightly touching the glass the whole time to break the surface tension.

I use only a small variation for wide windows, in which case I turn the brush on its side with the swivel, swipe it side to side like a wiper blade and bring it down a level at a time, again with the bristles just tickling the glass to break the surface tension and act as a final light agitation at the same time. This means that the glass gets agitated both vertically and horizontally.

I don't know what all the fuss is about with different glass and windows and wiping down. Totally unnecessary in my experience anyway.

I've never touched trad other than for a couple of minutes on my own windows when I first started. Very quickly decided 'nuts to that! I don't need it".

Edited by Davy G
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