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Soft Wash compatible kit


scholar

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Hello All

Nerdy amateur here! (We do have our windows professionally cleaned).

I have a regular need to clean our granite and slate courtyard of green algae etc and have recently successfully been using diluted Hypo.  I now want to improve my procedure by using a better system, with a proper soft wash mix and biocide, based on the Gardiner Backpack.  I have spent more time than I would like to admit looking for the right kit and fittings that will be compatible with soft wash chemicals and biocides.

I have read various excellent advice on here and elsewhere; I would appreciate any observations on where I have got to and others may find this of interest. 

I fully recognise that the Gardiner Backpack is not recommended for chemicals and am prepared for some replacements over time.  Unlike the professionals, I will only be using this kit on an occasional basis and will clean it out rigorously after each use - of course that may actually be worse than regular pro usage if the kit is left lying around for long periods and so I have tried to avoid metal components.  The problems I spent most time over was finding a suitable spray lance and fittings for the (fairly short) hose setup - the Gardiner spray hose would have been ideal, but the metal lance appeared too susceptible to the chemicals.

I settled on this lance https://www.lunesdale-pumps.co.uk/spray-watering-lances/23576-jolly-25-spray-lance-900mm-30-lpm-25-bar-4020009006.html that seemed good value and chemically resistant.  At this stage, I have only ordered acetal nozzles to get the hang of it and work out the best nozzle size, but I guess that these are not chemically resistant, in which case I will need some stainless steel ones in due course.

Next problem was the connections from lance to hose.  I want to standardise the hose connections as far as possible as being 8mm push fit (I want to add a WFP connection to enable occasional render cleaning and I have other uses elsewhere for the WFP, so interconnectability is important).

The Jolly 25 lance has a 1/2” BSP female input and so I thought, simple, I will get a 1/2” BSP male to 8mm pushfit female connector.  I could not find this in polypropylene which is resistant, only acetal which is not.  So I have ended up with a link hose using Hozelock type fittings (I am unclear how resistant these will be, but have found some PP parts).  I was going to use PU hose, but see that is not chemically resistant, so have changed that to PVC.

For the remainder of the hose fittings, I am going to use 8mm push fit/barbed fittings from Gardiner, but again I don’t know what they are made of - we will see.

I have found a John Guest 8mm push fit PP valve that I will fit to the WFP set up.

The use of the WFP for the render clean is likely to be a one-off and so I don’t expect too many problems from a 2% Hypo solution, but I don’t know if the brush jets are susceptible to chemical damage.

Anyway, if anybody has any helpful observations, I would be very grateful.

 

Cheers

 

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5 hours ago, scholar said:

Hello All

Nerdy amateur here! (We do have our windows professionally cleaned).

I have a regular need to clean our granite and slate courtyard of green algae etc and have recently successfully been using diluted Hypo.  I now want to improve my procedure by using a better system, with a proper soft wash mix and biocide, based on the Gardiner Backpack.  I have spent more time than I would like to admit looking for the right kit and fittings that will be compatible with soft wash chemicals and biocides.

I have read various excellent advice on here and elsewhere; I would appreciate any observations on where I have got to and others may find this of interest. 

I fully recognise that the Gardiner Backpack is not recommended for chemicals and am prepared for some replacements over time.  Unlike the professionals, I will only be using this kit on an occasional basis and will clean it out rigorously after each use - of course that may actually be worse than regular pro usage if the kit is left lying around for long periods and so I have tried to avoid metal components.  The problems I spent most time over was finding a suitable spray lance and fittings for the (fairly short) hose setup - the Gardiner spray hose would have been ideal, but the metal lance appeared too susceptible to the chemicals.

I settled on this lance https://www.lunesdale-pumps.co.uk/spray-watering-lances/23576-jolly-25-spray-lance-900mm-30-lpm-25-bar-4020009006.html that seemed good value and chemically resistant.  At this stage, I have only ordered acetal nozzles to get the hang of it and work out the best nozzle size, but I guess that these are not chemically resistant, in which case I will need some stainless steel ones in due course.

Next problem was the connections from lance to hose.  I want to standardise the hose connections as far as possible as being 8mm push fit (I want to add a WFP connection to enable occasional render cleaning and I have other uses elsewhere for the WFP, so interconnectability is important).

The Jolly 25 lance has a 1/2” BSP female input and so I thought, simple, I will get a 1/2” BSP male to 8mm pushfit female connector.  I could not find this in polypropylene which is resistant, only acetal which is not.  So I have ended up with a link hose using Hozelock type fittings (I am unclear how resistant these will be, but have found some PP parts).  I was going to use PU hose, but see that is not chemically resistant, so have changed that to PVC.

For the remainder of the hose fittings, I am going to use 8mm push fit/barbed fittings from Gardiner, but again I don’t know what they are made of - we will see.

I have found a John Guest 8mm push fit PP valve that I will fit to the WFP set up.

The use of the WFP for the render clean is likely to be a one-off and so I don’t expect too many problems from a 2% Hypo solution, but I don’t know if the brush jets are susceptible to chemical damage.

Anyway, if anybody has any helpful observations, I would be very grateful.

 

Cheers

 

So are you arnt a window cleaner then ??? Ime assuming that you are a home owner trying to do a job for yourself , rather than get a professional in to do the job ?.. hypo isn’t a product to be using unless you know how to use it safely , what it can be mixed with and more importantly what it cannot be mixed with , if it’s just a patio type of job it shouldn’t need cleaning more than once a year , it would be far easier for you to get someone in to do the job for you annually, saving you all the hassle of buying kit and having it standing around 11 months of the year not being used.  A backpack just sat in a shed most of the time won’t be a reliable piece of equipment like most things frequent use is much better . 

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5 hours ago, scholar said:

Hello All

Nerdy amateur here! (We do have our windows professionally cleaned).

I have a regular need to clean our granite and slate courtyard of green algae etc and have recently successfully been using diluted Hypo.  I now want to improve my procedure by using a better system, with a proper soft wash mix and biocide, based on the Gardiner Backpack.  I have spent more time than I would like to admit looking for the right kit and fittings that will be compatible with soft wash chemicals and biocides.

I have read various excellent advice on here and elsewhere; I would appreciate any observations on where I have got to and others may find this of interest. 

I fully recognise that the Gardiner Backpack is not recommended for chemicals and am prepared for some replacements over time.  Unlike the professionals, I will only be using this kit on an occasional basis and will clean it out rigorously after each use - of course that may actually be worse than regular pro usage if the kit is left lying around for long periods and so I have tried to avoid metal components.  The problems I spent most time over was finding a suitable spray lance and fittings for the (fairly short) hose setup - the Gardiner spray hose would have been ideal, but the metal lance appeared too susceptible to the chemicals.

I settled on this lance https://www.lunesdale-pumps.co.uk/spray-watering-lances/23576-jolly-25-spray-lance-900mm-30-lpm-25-bar-4020009006.html that seemed good value and chemically resistant.  At this stage, I have only ordered acetal nozzles to get the hang of it and work out the best nozzle size, but I guess that these are not chemically resistant, in which case I will need some stainless steel ones in due course.

Next problem was the connections from lance to hose.  I want to standardise the hose connections as far as possible as being 8mm push fit (I want to add a WFP connection to enable occasional render cleaning and I have other uses elsewhere for the WFP, so interconnectability is important).

The Jolly 25 lance has a 1/2” BSP female input and so I thought, simple, I will get a 1/2” BSP male to 8mm pushfit female connector.  I could not find this in polypropylene which is resistant, only acetal which is not.  So I have ended up with a link hose using Hozelock type fittings (I am unclear how resistant these will be, but have found some PP parts).  I was going to use PU hose, but see that is not chemically resistant, so have changed that to PVC.

For the remainder of the hose fittings, I am going to use 8mm push fit/barbed fittings from Gardiner, but again I don’t know what they are made of - we will see.

I have found a John Guest 8mm push fit PP valve that I will fit to the WFP set up.

The use of the WFP for the render clean is likely to be a one-off and so I don’t expect too many problems from a 2% Hypo solution, but I don’t know if the brush jets are susceptible to chemical damage.

Anyway, if anybody has any helpful observations, I would be very grateful.

 

Cheers

 

There are a whole host of chemical lances and sprayer attachments available online.

Brass, stainless, aluminium and so on. 

All fittings can be changed and hose adapted with ease 

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41 minutes ago, Pjj said:

So are you arnt a window cleaner then ??? Ime assuming that you are a home owner trying to do a job for yourself , rather than get a professional in to do the job ?.. hypo isn’t a product to be using unless you know how to use it safely , what it can be mixed with and more importantly what it cannot be mixed with , if it’s just a patio type of job it shouldn’t need cleaning more than once a year , it would be far easier for you to get someone in to do the job for you annually, saving you all the hassle of buying kit and having it standing around 11 months of the year not being used.  A backpack just sat in a shed most of the time won’t be a reliable piece of equipment like most things frequent use is much better . 

Hi

Thanks for the comments.

TBF I did say I was an amateur, although it would be more fair to say that I spend my time maintaining a number of buildings (so maybe “semi-professional”) - I am not a window cleaner (and as mentioned we have the windows cleaned professionally),  There are various reasons why we do the courtyard cleaning in-house along with other routine maintenance of a complicated old building - it is not just a patio and we find it needs cleaning more regularly.  I have taken great care to research the use of “hypo” and have some practical experience of using it safely.

My underlying question(s) related to the availability of fittings in suitable chemical resistant materials - all my searches indicated plenty of experience of frustration with leaking fittings - brass, aluminium and steel fittings  are susceptible to corrosion and some plastics appear to not be resilient - and there does not appear to be a comprehensive range of chemical resistant fittings.

Of course, the concentrations I will be using would be unlikely to cause a major problem quickly, but i just thought some others may have some insight on some of the fittings I am using.  No doubt many just accept that fittings are changed when they leak and that maybe the most efficient approach - I would rather do it properly and having commenced the challenge of finding the right stuff, wanted to get the full answer!

Cheers

 

 

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3 minutes ago, scholar said:

No doubt many just accept that fittings are changed when they leak and that maybe the most efficient approach

I think you find that people who work with hypo a lot accept that fittings don't last and think it's just part of the job. I think that the only material that will really withstand hypo is polypropylene. The rest will gradually fail.

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10 hours ago, scholar said:

Hi

Thanks for the comments.

TBF I did say I was an amateur, although it would be more fair to say that I spend my time maintaining a number of buildings (so maybe “semi-professional”) - I am not a window cleaner (and as mentioned we have the windows cleaned professionally),  There are various reasons why we do the courtyard cleaning in-house along with other routine maintenance of a complicated old building - it is not just a patio and we find it needs cleaning more regularly.  I have taken great care to research the use of “hypo” and have some practical experience of using it safely.

My underlying question(s) related to the availability of fittings in suitable chemical resistant materials - all my searches indicated plenty of experience of frustration with leaking fittings - brass, aluminium and steel fittings  are susceptible to corrosion and some plastics appear to not be resilient - and there does not appear to be a comprehensive range of chemical resistant fittings.

Of course, the concentrations I will be using would be unlikely to cause a major problem quickly, but i just thought some others may have some insight on some of the fittings I am using.  No doubt many just accept that fittings are changed when they leak and that maybe the most efficient approach - I would rather do it properly and having commenced the challenge of finding the right stuff, wanted to get the full answer!

Cheers

 

 

Without wishing to be rude or cause offence , you are a home owner trying to jo a job that us as professional business offer  on the cheap , you want us to tell you what kit you need and ware to get it , let’s put it this way if you had a problem with your car and you go to the local garage and said  I don’t want you to fix the car just tell me what’s wrong with it and how to fix it and ware can I get the parts what response do you think you are going to get ???  We are professional people on hear employing staff and you are trying to take the bread out of our mouths , I am more than happy to try and help ones who are learning this trade but not prepared to do myself and others out of work by supplying all my trade knowledge and contacts it has taken me well over 20 years to get ware I am and you just expect us to give you all this information, I feel that’s very cheeky , sorry but it’s just not on . 

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18 minutes ago, Pjj said:

Without wishing to be rude or cause offence , you are a home owner trying to jo a job that us as professional business offer  on the cheap , you want us to tell you what kit you need and ware to get it , let’s put it this way if you had a problem with your car and you go to the local garage and said  I don’t want you to fix the car just tell me what’s wrong with it and how to fix it and ware can I get the parts what response do you think you are going to get ???  We are professional people on hear employing staff and you are trying to take the bread out of our mouths , I am more than happy to try and help ones who are learning this trade but not prepared to do myself and others out of work by supplying all my trade knowledge and contacts it has taken me well over 20 years to get ware I am and you just expect us to give you all this information, I feel that’s very cheeky , sorry but it’s just not on . 

@pjj I am truly sorry that you see it this way, but I don’t feel that I have just sought to filch trade secrets for personal gain.
 

You may have had a point if I had just asked for a list of stuff I need and how to use it, but as I mentioned, I had already scoured the market for appropriate components and I actually thought that a discussion on these points would be mutually beneficial (as has been said, it is clear that the problem of incompatible fittings is a common experience).
 

 My sentiment was far more that having spent some time trying to solve the problem, possibly obsessively 🙂, I thought I would share what I had found. 

Cheers

 

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5 minutes ago, scholar said:

@pjj I am truly sorry that you see it this way, but I don’t feel that I have just sought to filch trade secrets for personal gain.
 

You may have had a point if I had just asked for a list of stuff I need and how to use it, but as I mentioned, I had already scoured the market for appropriate components and I actually thought that a discussion on these points would be mutually beneficial (as has been said, it is clear that the problem of incompatible fittings is a common experience).
 

 My sentiment was far more that having spent some time trying to solve the problem, possibly obsessively 🙂, I thought I would share what I had found. 

Cheers

 

As I said I don’t want to cause offence but the whole point of this forum is for trade people to help each other learn the job not give joe public the answers to be able to then do the job himself, I have no idear what you do/did for work but sure you wouldn’t readily hand out all the info you have learned over the years so ones can do it for themselves, there are comparable fittings out there that work well together but again I have personally spent hundreds/thousands of £££ trying out stuff some is good some is rubbish, hypo will destroy most things given time , none of the kit you need likes to be used on an odd occasion, I  still feel you are better off getting a professional company in to do the job safely and economically for you , I don’t want to cause offence but this forum is designed for trade people to help one another we get far to many come on hear asking questions all they do is take they never give anything back then when they have got  what they want they  disappear until they need more help , ime not saying you are like this but just saying this is what happens a lot . 

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14 hours ago, ched999uk said:

I think you find that people who work with hypo a lot accept that fittings don't last and think it's just part of the job. I think that the only material that will really withstand hypo is polypropylene. The rest will gradually fail.

Thanks. Yes, that is the conclusion I got to - and in the scheme of things the fittings are cheap so it is probably easiest to replace them as and when they fail. I have based my initial set up on the best parts I could find reasonably economically after quite a bit of research and I will probably refine this over time - I’ll see how it goes and report back with any new pearls of wisdom!

 

Cheers

 

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