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Zero PPB vs Zero PPM?


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"Water at 0ppb is one thousand times purer than water at 0ppm and because pure water cleans by dissolving dirt ions, it follows that water at 0ppb is capable of dissolving 1,000 times more dirt than water of 0ppm."

 

Is cleaning using water purified to 0ppb easier/better than 0ppm?

 

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3 minutes ago, Part Timer said:

I believe that @doug atkinson has some info regarding this, I think he said it's better then using hot water so don't tell @Pjj 😂

But is the difference between 0ppb and 0ppm noticeable to us window cleaner plebs, us mere mortals? Does spending a fortune on an Ionics machine justify the cost?

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doug atkinson

The feed back I have had is it does a better clean but you have to be rigid with your ppm. The companies that now use it have found first cleans they get a better result than hot water. With hot water they used to sometimes get asked to return and do the job again. With ppb the percentage of call backs has decreased by 90% so they see the benefit in it.

The resin is expensive but if you are strict with the ppm going in the it is not that expensive on the amount of cleans you get from it. As soon as your ordinary DI chamber creeps up you change the resin so it has less impact on the nuclear grade resin.

For measuring the water after the Nuclear grade resin you need a high quality meter that measures ms/cm. This is what you measure it, not ppm.

We have regular customers that use it and they roughly go through a bag a year as they are strict on the ppm going in.

One comment I have received is the water sheets a lot better on the glass.

This method is not for everyone but those looking for a better spot free rinse.

 

 

 

 

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Just taken delivery of my new pure water Nuclear DI system. Cost me £93.5 million 

 

I've heard alot about ppb and some of the kit is pricey. A small laboratory grade desktop machine was ridiculous money and it only produced 10mg of water in a vile 

20210411_135342.jpg

  • Haha 3
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RyeCleanLiam
1 hour ago, doug atkinson said:

The feed back I have had is it does a better clean but you have to be rigid with your ppm. The companies that now use it have found first cleans they get a better result than hot water. With hot water they used to sometimes get asked to return and do the job again. With ppb the percentage of call backs has decreased by 90% so they see the benefit in it.

The resin is expensive but if you are strict with the ppm going in the it is not that expensive on the amount of cleans you get from it. As soon as your ordinary DI chamber creeps up you change the resin so it has less impact on the nuclear grade resin.

For measuring the water after the Nuclear grade resin you need a high quality meter that measures ms/cm. This is what you measure it, not ppm.

We have regular customers that use it and they roughly go through a bag a year as they are strict on the ppm going in.

One comment I have received is the water sheets a lot better on the glass.

This method is not for everyone but those looking for a better spot free rinse.

 

 

 

 

So in regards to the set up @doug atkinson is it just a case of buying another resin vessel and a bag of nuclear grade resin? Then having the nuclear resin after the normal resin?

And what ppm would you recommend the normal resin gets to before you change it to stop it affecting the nuclear resin?

Edited by RyeCleanLiam
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"Spotless Water uses advanced technology to make sure the water is ultra pure" - is that 0ppb? Ive used spotless before and now produce my own 0ppm (thanks to @doug atkinson) and dont see any diffrence.

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16 minutes ago, RyeCleanLiam said:

So in regards to the set up Doug is it just a case of buying another resin vessel and a bag of nuclear grade resin? Then having the nuclear resin after the normal resin?

And what ppm would you recommend the normal resin gets to before you change it?

With regards to your question what ppm does normal resin get to before changing it. Quite a popular question that's been asked lots of times

If you want to stick to the wording of "pure water" then it should always be 000ppm Quite a few people will work with it upto 009ppm 

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RyeCleanLiam
1 minute ago, Apw1210 said:

With regards to your question what ppm does normal resin get to before changing it. Quite a popular question that's been asked lots of times

If you want to stick to the wording of "pure water" then it should always be 000ppm Quite a few people will work with it upto 009ppm 

Thanks fella. I wasn't very clear in the post so I've changed the wording 😂 I meant what ppm would Doug recommend to change normal resin before it starts affecting the nuclear resin if I go down that route. I usually let mine get to 003 for cleaning. But thinking of trying nuclear resin see if it's any better.

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26 minutes ago, RyeCleanLiam said:

So in regards to the set up @doug atkinson is it just a case of buying another resin vessel and a bag of nuclear grade resin? Then having the nuclear resin after the normal resin?

And what ppm would you recommend the normal resin gets to before you change it to stop it affecting the nuclear resin?

No problem mate. Have a lovely day 

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Master Jedi Alejandro
59 minutes ago, RyeCleanLiam said:

So in regards to the set up @doug atkinson is it just a case of buying another resin vessel and a bag of nuclear grade resin? Then having the nuclear resin after the normal resin?

And what ppm would you recommend the normal resin gets to before you change it to stop it affecting the nuclear resin?

I am also interested in this. Also, @doug atkinson, what would happen if you used just the nuclear grade resin without prepurifying? I wonder as if it gets you better results that hot water, even at £240 a bag it’s still a lot cheaper than hot water 😂

Edited by Master Jedi Alejandro
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RyeCleanLiam
2 minutes ago, Pjj said:

Ionic’s way of doing it is to pump the tank water through the nuclear resin for 3 hours , not just pass it through once 

Thought it sounded too good to be true just buying nuclear resin and running it through 😂 

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30 minutes ago, RyeCleanLiam said:

Thought it sounded too good to be true just buying nuclear resin and running it through 😂 

What about radiation?

  • Haha 2
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1 hour ago, Pjj said:

Ionic’s way of doing it is to pump the tank water through the nuclear resin for 3 hours , not just pass it through once 

Do you mean they circulate the water for 3 hours? 

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2 hours ago, RyeCleanLiam said:

Thanks fella. I wasn't very clear in the post so I've changed the wording 😂 I meant what ppm would Doug recommend to change normal resin before it starts affecting the nuclear resin if I go down that route. I usually let mine get to 003 for cleaning. But thinking of trying nuclear resin see if it's any better.

If you let it get above zero you would be wasting the nuclear resin which seems pretty daft considering the cost dynamics.

 

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doug atkinson
2 hours ago, Pjj said:

Ionic’s way of doing it is to pump the tank water through the nuclear resin for 3 hours , not just pass it through once 

Do they, sounds bit odd. A plant near us where they need Ultra pure is Softening resin - filters - membrane - stage 1 DI - nuclear grade DI. They do not recirculate. And their water has to have no organic in the water.

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