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Guys ...

 

Seeing a lot of chemicals in here ubik , virosol hypo.....is there a go to situation for all of them or are they all personal preference.

I’ve been using ubik for everything

 

 

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scottish cleaning service

Hypo is mainly for softwashing patios and driveways. Ubik, screwfix degreaser, virosol is mainly the same and will not damage glass, so safe to use on fsg, pvc or window frames. Use to strong a hypo mix and it touches glass and you may burn it and you will have to replace the glass unit.

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kevinc250
2 hours ago, scottish cleaning service said:

Hypo is mainly for softwashing patios and driveways. Ubik, screwfix degreaser, virosol is mainly the same and will not damage glass, so safe to use on fsg, pvc or window frames. Use to strong a hypo mix and it touches glass and you may burn it and you will have to replace the glass unit.

i'll have to disagree with you on this one,hypo used with the correct surfactant and the correct ratio is very usefull in some cases,it won't damage glass whatsoever,ubik can and will leave a film if not used correctly,ie in warm weather cool the glass first,(pre wet)and keep the glass cool and wet at all times,virosol is the nicer option although its been many a year since I've used ubik and virosol as theres better options.

theres no go to solution as theres so many different types of dirt/**** you may need to clean,a simple tfr would suffice and be much safer in most circumstances,if you need to clean grease off a surface then use screwfix  degreaser,the name gives you a clue.

have a look at snow foam,its something I've used for years and gives good results whilst at the same time being easy to manage on larger homes

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Pjj

Did a conservatory about 15 years ago with tfr marked the glass and plastic couldn’t do anything with it and yes it was applied at the correct dilution rate it did dry out a bit as was summer time luckily the customer didn’t notice but never used it since , virosol is good stuff and we have used that since far better for general gfs cleaning than tfr in my opinion , less likely good of causing irreversible damage 

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RWCleaning

I’ve used TFR2 for the last couple of years. It went out of date so got rid of it on Thursday. But funny enough ordered Ubik 2000 yesterday, never used it before, but yes I agree TFR does go sticky if left too long.

 

Anyone use Ubik?? Any tips? 

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scottish cleaning service
35 minutes ago, kevinc250 said:

i'll have to disagree with you on this one,hypo used with the correct surfactant and the correct ratio is very usefull in some cases,it won't damage glass whatsoever,ubik can and will leave a film if not used correctly,ie in warm weather cool the glass first,(pre wet)and keep the glass cool and wet at all times,virosol is the nicer option although its been many a year since I've used ubik and virosol as theres better options.

theres no go to solution as theres so many different types of dirt/**** you may need to clean,a simple tfr would suffice and be much safer in most circumstances,if you need to clean grease off a surface then use screwfix  degreaser,the name gives you a clue.

have a look at snow foam,its something I've used for years and gives good results whilst at the same time being easy to manage on larger homes

 

Thanks Kevin, Only going on my own experience regarding hypo (hypochlorite acid) or an acid based solution. I cleaned my patio window with hard surface cleaner and it burnt it and the streaks wouldn't come off. That's why I now use a degreaser based solution when I'm near glass just in case.

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Dave B
41 minutes ago, scottish cleaning service said:

 

Thanks Kevin, Only going on my own experience regarding hypo (hypochlorite acid) or an acid based solution. I cleaned my patio window with hard surface cleaner and it burnt it and the streaks wouldn't come off. That's why I now use a degreaser based solution when I'm near glass just in case.

That is the problem with people using chems with no knowledge of them

Hypo is not acid it is alkali and actually the main constituent of bleach

All chems have their use but you have to know what it is for and it's reactions with other chemicals

Edited by Dave B

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scottish cleaning service
26 minutes ago, Dave B said:

That is the problem with people using chems with no knowledge of them

Hypo is not acid it is alkali and actually the main constituent of bleach

All chems have their use but you have to know what it is for and it's reactions with other chemicals

 

Cheers Dave I always thought bleach was an alkali.

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Dave B
2 hours ago, kevinc250 said:

i'll have to disagree with you on this one,hypo used with the correct surfactant and the correct ratio is very usefull in some cases,it won't damage glass whatsoever,ubik can and will leave a film if not used correctly,ie in warm weather cool the glass first,(pre wet)and keep the glass cool and wet at all times,virosol is the nicer option although its been many a year since I've used ubik and virosol as theres better options.

theres no go to solution as theres so many different types of dirt/**** you may need to clean,a simple tfr would suffice and be much safer in most circumstances,if you need to clean grease off a surface then use screwfix  degreaser,the name gives you a clue.

have a look at snow foam,its something I've used for years and gives good results whilst at the same time being easy to manage on larger homes

 

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