Self-Cleaning Glass Salt/lime Deposits

Discussion in 'Traditional Window Cleaning' started by Dominic Bond, Oct 5, 2013.

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  1. Dominic Bond

    Dominic Bond Newcomer
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    I have been cleaning a property for about six months on a four-weekly basis using the traditional method. It turned out that the glass is self-cleaning and heavy deposits of lime/salt has appeared on the glass (we are near the sea and it rains a lot around here). The customer called the glass company and they blamed me (the window cleaner) for using washing-up liquid. I have since Googled Pilkington and they say that you can use detergent on their windows, but not to use blades. I admit using my blade (with plenty of water on some of the windows, but I dont think that is the cause of the problem. The customer would like to know if there is anything that can take the deposits of salt/lime off the window. I would be grateful for a reply as he is trying to pin the blame of €10,000s of damage to me.

    Thank you
     
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  2. Smurf

    Smurf Banned
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    Just to clarify when you said you used a blade do you mean a glass scraper or squeegee?
     
  3. Smurf

    Smurf Banned
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    If you use either and the customer finds out their self cleaning glass dosen't work as well as it should then yes you are in deep dodo I am affraid as you could end up with a large claim on your hands.. For your sake I do hope you are insured for damage to the property being worked on

    This maybe of interest http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=5&ved=0CFcQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fcms.pilkington.com%2Fassetmanager_ws%2Ffileserver.aspx%3Fcmd%3Dget_file%26file_id%3D3562%26digest%3DMeHyyfZcgg5M388jnWiioA%3D%3D%26ct%3Dpdf%26file_name%3DPilkington_Activ__Cleaning_and_Maintenance_Guidelines.pdf&ei=QDtQUs3IKKO50QXi94HIBg&usg=AFQjCNEh4BGzIy6C7miZd0iTQZhGm3fr2Q&bvm=bv.53537100,d.d2k
     
  4. rugbywolf

    rugbywolf Forum Addict
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    I have a customer who had a big conservatory put on the back. I asked if he wanted it doing, and he said that he hadn't paid out all that money for self cleaning glass to have a window cleaner do them. Fair enough, but some twelve months or so later they were in a really dirty state, as we all know - self cleaning glass does not work. So, eventually, the lady asked me to clean them - a one off - which I did, and they were fine. Now they are dirty again!!! I tell you this because I know for a fact that this conservatory was never cleaned by me or anybody else from the time when it was put in up 'til I did it. Even the builder doing the job agreed with me that it doesn't work (all the windys that I know, know it doesn't work). I would not have thought that any normal detergent would harm the glass, or either a rubber squeegee blade. So I would adamantly not accept responsibility.
     
  5. David Taylor

    David Taylor Well-Known Member
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  6. Eclipse

    Eclipse Well-Known Member
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    Clay (automotive clay) will remove the deposits and leave the window cleaner than it's ever been, spray soapy water on the glas and rub it with clay keeping it lubed up and it will be fine.
     
  7. Tuffers

    Tuffers Hero
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    Let me get this straight. Lime/salt has appeared on the glass and it's your fault? Wtf would cleaning with soapy water make the glass go salty?

    Tell him to do one!
     
  8. Tuffers

    Tuffers Hero
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    Side note. What happens to self cleaning glass when a bird deposits its acidy muck on the glass, does that wreck the glass too? Oh silly me, it cleans itself.
     
  9. Smurf

    Smurf Banned
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  10. Dominic Bond

    Dominic Bond Newcomer
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    Thanks for your replies guys.
    I had been out of the window cleaning game for ten years and since then these so-called self-cleaning glass windows have appeared. Yes! I have used traditional methods including using a scraper with plenty of water. I would argue that I was not expected to know that I cannot use a rubber squeegee or scraper (surely the window company should have mentioned about that to him and he should have communicated that to me (particularly as I wouldn't have know that the glass is so-called self-cleaning and needs special treatment)). Also the customer agreed to me cleaning their windows using traditional methods.

    It appears that the window company was clueless as they blamed me for using washing up liquid not for using blades

    Now I think about it three or four customers have this kind of glass and it is totally unsuitable for the coastal area where I live. Right from the first time I have cleaned their windows they have had horrendous deposits on their windows (one person I have to clean most panes twice and some three times).
    I live in Southern Ireland and Insurance costs €3k + per year so insurance is out of the question.

    Thanks for the glass restorer link. I will order some but will ask the customer to sign a disclaimer before using it.
     
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