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deanno

When is old too old

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deanno

I've been a lorry driver for the last 35 years, and have always done nights. But now they want us to do 13+ hours a night now or take redundancy. So thinking of taking the money and getting a van and wfp setup. But would a reasonably fit bloke in his 50's be able to cope with the pole etc.

Cheers Dean

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solarpanelcleaningltd

If you want it you’ll be fine. Just don’t push yourself. Listen to your body.

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Pjj
3 minutes ago, deanno said:

I've been a lorry driver for the last 35 years, and have always done nights. But now they want us to do 13+ hours a night now or take redundancy. So thinking of taking the money and getting a van and wfp setup. But would a reasonably fit bloke in his 50's be able to cope with the pole etc.

Cheers Dean

Ime 58 this year and do 8 hours a day five days a week , it will take you a while to get used to it but yes you should be fine doing it , you will also  have to build up a round so won’t be doing huge amounts initially 

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THL4KEL

Some poles are better than others. The best pole is Gardeners Xtreme poles. Highest grade of carbon fibre, very rigid, very light. But not cheap. 

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Markyboy 50

Do both mate. I do windows and hgv driving. Easy to find a few days or nights driving. 

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Part Timer

All I would say is as long as you build up your muscle mass slowly you'll be alright. You will use a total different set of muscles then you do now. As @Markyboy 50suggested if you did a few days driving and a few days washing windows it should keep the strain off everything, including finances.

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Davy G
17 hours ago, deanno said:

I've been a lorry driver for the last 35 years, and have always done nights. But now they want us to do 13+ hours a night now or take redundancy. So thinking of taking the money and getting a van and wfp setup. But would a reasonably fit bloke in his 50's be able to cope with the pole etc.

Cheers Dean

No mate, it's fine if you're fairly fit. You don't need to be an athlete, especially with the lightness of modern equipment. I started six years ago at the age of 58.

Take the advice of the guys who've already answered your post. Do it part time combined with your driving to keep the money coming in while you see if it suits you, and listen to your body.

Good luck. You know where we are if we can help you. 🙂👍

Ps. I'm a former lorry driver. I'd prefer this any day. No one on the phone telling me they want me thirty miles away in thirty minutes before the quarry closes. And the amount of legal responsibility being largely on my shoulders.

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Robt100

Physically I think you'll be fine. I've went from a driving and sitting-drinking-tea job to window cleaning, and have existing back problems but have been reasonably fine considering I haven't exercised in about a decade! A good quality average size pole will be between 1-1.5kg, so if you've ever had to load/unload the truck in your time this should be easy🤣

Had the same dilemma as yourself, it was longer hours or redundancy, took the redundancy and used part of it to invest in the window cleaning, and part as a buffer to keep me going. I'd assume its a reasonable sum you would be getting?
I know some here are suggesting the part time of each, but that would obviously mean not getting the redundancy pay which I personally dont think would be a good idea. Maybe take the redundancy, get part time delivery driving and part time window cleaning. As sacrificing a nice lump sum isn't really worth it IMO just to ease into cleaning.

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Markyboy 50
31 minutes ago, Robt100 said:

Physically I think you'll be fine. I've went from a driving and sitting-drinking-tea job to window cleaning, and have existing back problems but have been reasonably fine considering I haven't exercised in about a decade! A good quality average size pole will be between 1-1.5kg, so if you've ever had to load/unload the truck in your time this should be easy🤣

Had the same dilemma as yourself, it was longer hours or redundancy, took the redundancy and used part of it to invest in the window cleaning, and part as a buffer to keep me going. I'd assume its a reasonable sum you would be getting?
I know some here are suggesting the part time of each, but that would obviously mean not getting the redundancy pay which I personally dont think would be a good idea. Maybe take the redundancy, get part time delivery driving and part time window cleaning. As sacrificing a nice lump sum isn't really worth it IMO just to ease into cleaning.

I meant take the redundancy then pick up part time work driving elsewhere!

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Part Timer
24 minutes ago, Markyboy 50 said:

I meant take the redundancy then pick up part time work driving elsewhere!

Loads of work at agencies, my friend does it and just picks and chooses what and when he wants to work.

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Markyboy 50
27 minutes ago, Part Timer said:

Loads of work at agencies, my friend does it and just picks and chooses what and when he wants to work.

Yep there’s loads of work out there for hgv drivers. I only drive for Dhl now and that’s on a zero houred contract. I turn down at least 2 days driving every week. The just can’t find the drivers. 

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High-tower

Its not the most physical job, but it is very repetitive and can cause issues from that, hands/wrists/elbows/shoulders/necks can all suffer.

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Dave B

I know someone who's dad still cleans windows with backpack on a trolley with reel attached and does a couple hundred quid a day and is about 70 or very near it.

If you do it for a while your body conditions itself to it.

However I'm now expanding the business at 45 so I don't have to be working past 50.

I feel it now when I get up in the morning. 

Try it and see.

If you feel it too much spend your time canvassing and get some guys out working for you and concentrate on the behind the scenes stuff.

Still good money to be made.

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ks789

Also, its probably gonna be beneficial to your body, compared to lorry driving. I find it a good workout, not too hard, but enough to know its done good.

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deanno

Thanks for the replies and encouragement. Just got to figure what i need van set up wise.

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scottish cleaning service
On 29/04/2020 at 13:29, High-tower said:

Its not the most physical job, but it is very repetitive and can cause issues from that, hands/wrists/elbows/shoulders/necks can all suffer.

I feel like a new lease in life after I bought a £23 Back Support Belt. I wear it when I'm working and its amazing and wouldn't be without it. I don't care what my doctor says because he seems to want me to suffer in pain when I'm out working.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Clever-Yellow-Support-Lower-Brace/dp/B00YSS53EI/ref=sr_1_7?crid=36STF1P936XGA&dchild=1&keywords=back+support+belt&qid=1588513726&sprefix=back+support%2Caps%2C157&sr=8-7

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NoName
Posted (edited)

Welcome onboard Deanno!

You've got the right idea - research and read everything to start with - it can feel very bewildering initially - it's a different language - but just like any job you soon get the lingo etc. If you know any local windies take 'em down the pub (if/when you can) and drill him for info - or just have a chat whenever you see one at work. Get a lot of opinions and decide who to trust - everyone has their own preferred set up/system  etc - but without over paying (when you get a payout) - it's easy to pay over the odds 'for a WFP system' which you'll soon realise is a big empty tank, some cheap tubing, a few filters, pump, battery and reel. You don't necessarily  'get' much more by paying a hefty premium for an all 'bells and whistles' system.

Ideally you want to hit the ground running with the setup that will last you a good few years - so think longer term - instead of struggling with a lot of manual workaround etc (backpack/refills etc) - some have to/ choose to get started like that but if you can a good setup is worth the outlay - life becomes much easier from day 1.

Support from good installer/supplier can be invaluable in your first year or two as you'll have issues - most of which are simple - but can send you into a blind panic - then it's nice to have a helpful pro on the end of phone talk you thru diagnosis/resolving an issue (e.g this week had battery issue - sorted by Oliver @ Grippatank in secs - that's what you gain by having a system installed (imho) over an diy setup which is far cheaper. If you're busy you'll soon recoup the initial outlay - but you loose a few days/week/s etc and you'll be kicking yourself. Always buy two or three of the key component especially anything which will obviously wear - if you have a single point of failure - e.g something as  mundane a single jubilee clip can mean you lose a half a day etc sorting it out!

You need to be a self starter, can take people saying 'no thanks' a few hundred times a day when you start out (canvassing) 😉 

Health wise - it's a manual job - it will take a toll - but the right stance/posture/lightweight tools etc all help as well as physio for any niggles and gym work for strengthening anything. Look after your back - esp mid winter - don't overlift etc...but as said it's repetitive which can cause rsi etc so go at a steady pace - plenty of good physio exercises online to keep you supple in all the right areas.

Being your own boss is invaluable - nothing like it! 

Go for it! (Luton's nowhere near my patch 🤣

Edited by NoName

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mupps
Posted (edited)

I am 61 this year and have been running my window cleaning business for nearly 8 years now. I clean 'trad' and that is the way I choose to run my business. It keeps me very fit, and although I used to have shoulder problems this type of cleaning has reduced the problems that I used to have dramatically. I do use a trad pole for some of my jobs but also use a ladder too. It's one of the best ways to make a living. Give it a go and I'm sure you won't look back. Be aware though that when the weather is cold and wet it has it's challenges; but when the weather is on your side it is heaven................and you get well paid for it too.

Also don't forget that there is a lot of support and advice on this forum. 

Good luck and stay safe.

John

Gleam Clean (The Tamar Valley, Cornwall) 

Edited by mupps
Typo

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HBM

I am 60 and I am very glad that I am doing this type of work. The variety of movements is good for the body. 

Canvassing for new clients can save you money but you can also buy an established business and have ready made accounts. Just add water and soap to get money!

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