Efflorescence

Discussion in 'Pressure Washing' started by Roland, Sep 3, 2016.

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  1. Roland

    Roland Stafford PowerWash Services
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    Washed a drive on Wednesday and part of it had been under a car port and the blocks looked like new compared to the ones on the drive.

    Got a phone call from the customer yesterday to say that there was white staining on the blocks under the car port.

    Having checked it out it is efflorescence caused by the washing (probably first time they have been washed), is there any way of getting rid of it or is it a case of keep washing it down until it doesn't come back?
     
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  2. Eviestevie

    Eviestevie Grand Master
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    Are you sure it wasn't already there it's quite common in any type of paving
    But now you've cleaned the drive it will show more
    Usually the better quilality blocks the more they suffer
    Washing it down helps but unfortunately it usually reappears it's all down to the way the blocks or slabs are made
    The more drives etc you will start to notice these things before you start and then point out to customer
    I always inspect anything I clean,then give customer the heads up
    Stops you being blamed
     
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  3. WWC

    WWC Well-Known Member
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    Never heard of efflorescence appearing that quick. But I have heard that efflorescence can be pressure washed away if you get it quickly after it appears, so i'm with Eviestevie - I can't see it being your fault.

    But...

    Brick acid brushed in, left to sit a while then rinsed off is the usual treatmnent for effloresence - like treating with hypohlorite, but you use brick acid or an equivalent efflorescence cleaning product.

    Have a look online for brick acid or brick cleaner, here are a couple of examples:

    Jewson Mortar & Brick Cleaner 5L - Other Building Chemicals | Jewson

    Ecochem Brick & Mortar Cleaner 1L | Departments | DIY at B&Q
     
  4. jason1965

    jason1965 Member
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    The efflorescence has nothing to do with you, efflorescence comes from the sand that is used when the wall is built, its a form of crystal, when the sand and cement dries sometimes it can leave a white looking powder, I know this because i used to do building work, it is very common, you will see it a lot on new buildings, and it can take years to clear.
     
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