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Posted (edited)

Hi everyone,

I’m wondering the name and/or make of pure water system you have set up in your van and the approximate cost and where you purchased it.

The reason I’m asking is to try and gain as much information as possible regarding the best and most viable option(s).

Any help would be much appreciated ✌😎

Thanks. 

Edited by Guest
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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, TrixxyKicks said:

Hi everyone,

I’m wondering the name and/or make of pure water system you have set up in your van and the approximate cost and where you purchased it.

The reason I’m asking is to try and gain as much information as possible regarding the best and most viable option(s).

Any help would be much appreciated ✌😎

Thanks. 

Up to £30,000 including a van.

You need to read this

https://windowcleaningforums.co.uk/blog/how-to-start-a-window-cleaning-business/?do=getNewComment

and this

https://windowcleaningforums.co.uk/blog/water-fed-pole-window-cleaning/

Nobody can 'spoon feed' you with your ideal setup because everyone's setup is different.

What is the TDS of the water from your tap? If its low then you might be able to purify your water with resin only to start with. So if you are serious about this then your first purchase is a tds meter. Have you got a place to store water? Can you buy water?

How are you going to get customers? I see you reacted to another post regarding a website. A website works for some but not others. I'm old school and door knocking was one of the best ways to get the ball rolling. However, Covid19 has put that on the back burner for the meantime. Unfortunately many believe that a website will bring in all the customers they need without any other effort. We've seen it many times before.

Why do you think you want to be a window cleaner?

 

Edited by spruce
  • Like 3
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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, spruce said:

Up to £30,000 including a van.

You need to read this

https://windowcleaningforums.co.uk/blog/how-to-start-a-window-cleaning-business/?do=getNewComment

and this

https://windowcleaningforums.co.uk/blog/water-fed-pole-window-cleaning/

Nobody can 'spoon feed' you with your ideal setup because everyone's setup is different.

What is the TDS of the water from your tap? If its low then you might be able to purify your water with resin only to start with. So if you are serious about this then your first purchase is a tds meter. Have you got a place to store water? Can you buy water?

How are you going to get customers? I see you reacted to another post regarding a website. A website works for some but not others. I'm old school and door knocking was one of the best ways to get the ball rolling. However, Covid19 has put that on the back burner for the meantime. Unfortunately many believe that a website will bring in all the customers they need without any other effort. We've seen it many times before.

Why do you think you want to be a window cleaner?

 

Hi Spruce, thanks for your reply.

I’ve previously read over both the threads you’ve highlighted, a lot of very good information in them and I’ve been delving in to every thread on this forum since I’ve joined.

I live in a soft water area, so the TDS is low. I appreciate I could rely on just a DI system but I was trying to find out if there’s any added benefit in an RO system or whether it would be unnecessary. Storing and producing water isn’t a problem.

In terms of building up a customer base I’ll be utilising every possible method available. A professional looking website and making sure it’s enabled to rank well on Google, all the social media platforms - Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube - flyers, networking, and of course door-to-door canvassing as well. I’ve also several ideas for a few guerrilla marketing options to get the name out there, something a bit more left field and out the box. Starting on a business I think you really need to aggressively market it and throw your time and energy into it in order to see the best return on it. Of course your standard of work, your image and reliability and so forth comes in to play as well, but the more you put in, the more you get back.

Your last question is a good and valid one, I question I think should be asked to anyone starting in any industry. Of course the answer will be subjective dependant on who you ask, but I feel it’s only fair to give you an entirely open and honest answer...

I come from a sales and business development background (for the most part). I’ve worked for many large corporate companies, managing multiple internal and external stakeholders, worked the 9-5, the 12-8, the 8-6, the 1-10, the 8-8, the 10-10 and so on. I give all my time and effort for the company I’m working for. I’m a hard worker, never late, always do the overtime and get paid a good wage for it. I’ve progressed a lot in my career and for a lot of people that would be sufficient - meandering along indoctrinated by the corporate world. If I close a sale, generate a lead or gain a new client (albeit I get paid a bonus for doing so) it’s the company which profits, not me. Working for large corporations, they very rarely congratulate you on your hard work, all the hours, all the sacrifices, all the pressure. However, on the contrary, they are very quick to highlight your mistakes and lost chances - where you went wrong.

Now I understand only too well that being self employed/having your own business isn’t all bells and whistles, and you’ve asked why window cleaning? Well... I think a lot of us can agree that being self employed has its benefits. It certainly negates a lot of the aforementioned caveats above. But to answer your question properly I think it needs to be done from two different perspectives - from a business angle and from a personal view.

Business - It would allow me to put my life and soul in to a business/brand/company where I could take it as far as I want. It would give me the flexibility to manage things the way I want them managed based on my outlook and ambitions. It would provide me an honest wage by providing a professional and high quality service. The workload I acquire and the hours I put in will be reflecting on my brand and not towards the corporate greed of a large company.

Personal - Satisfaction, Satisfaction, Satisfaction. Being able to stand back from the work you’ve done and see the results. The before and afters. Knowing that the work you’ve done has directly provided a good service to a customer. Waking up to start a hard shift with the knowledge that you don’t have X, Y and Z of business directors breathing down your neck. Knowing that all the time, effort and hard work you put in directly contributes to you and your business.

Hopefully that hasn’t came across as too verbose! But seeing as this is my first post on the forum, thought it only fair to give a bit more of a detailed answer.

Any feedback and help is welcomed ✌😎

Edited by Guest
Link to post
13 hours ago, TrixxyKicks said:

Hi everyone,

I’m wondering the name and/or make of pure water system you have set up in your van and the approximate cost and where you purchased it.

The reason I’m asking is to try and gain as much information as possible regarding the best and most viable option(s).

Any help would be much appreciated ✌😎

Thanks. 

 

I have a

210L baffled tank £178.98 

Shurflo 100psi 8000 series pump £96

Claber ground 40 hose reel £54

Hi vis 100m hose £69.98 

Spring Europe Ltd V11 pump controller  £0.00 

Homemade cage enclosure and fasteners £0.00 

12v 110aH leisure battery £98.00 

Associated battery connections cabling and home charger £100.00 

Hoses clamps and fittings £60.00

 

All approximate pricing from the top of my head 

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1 hour ago, TrixxyKicks said:

Hi Spruce, thanks for your reply.

I’ve previously read over both the threads you’ve highlighted, a lot of very good information in them and I’ve been delving in to every thread on this forum since I’ve joined.

I live in a soft water area, so the TDS is low. I appreciate I could rely on just a DI system but I was trying to find out if there’s any added benefit in an RO system or whether it would be unnecessary. Storing and producing water isn’t a problem.

In terms of building up a customer base I’ll be utilising every possible method available. A professional looking website and making sure it’s enabled to rank well on Google, all the social media platforms - Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube - flyers, networking, and of course door-to-door canvassing as well. I’ve also several ideas for a few guerrilla marketing options to get the name out there, something a bit more left field and out the box. Starting on a business I think you really need to aggressively market it and throw your time and energy into it in order to see the best return on it. Of course your standard of work, your image and reliability and so forth comes in to play as well, but the more you put in, the more you get back.

Your last question is a good and valid one, I question I think should be asked to anyone starting in any industry. Of course the answer will be subjective dependant on who you ask, but I feel it’s only fair to give you an entirely open and honest answer...

I come from a sales and business development background (for the most part). I’ve worked for many large corporate companies, managing multiple internal and external stakeholders, worked the 9-5, the 12-8, the 8-6, the 1-10, the 8-8, the 10-10 and so on. I give all my time and effort for the company I’m working for. I’m a hard worker, never late, always do the overtime and get paid a good wage for it. I’ve progressed a lot in my career and for a lot of people that would be sufficient - meandering along indoctrinated by the corporate world. If I close a sale, generate a lead or gain a new client (albeit I get paid a bonus for doing so) it’s the company which profits, not me. Working for large corporations, they very rarely congratulate you on your hard work, all the hours, all the sacrifices, all the pressure. However, on the contrary, they are very quick to highlight your mistakes and lost chances - where you went wrong.

Now I understand only too well that being self employed/having your own business isn’t all bells and whistles, and you’ve asked why window cleaning? Well... I think a lot of us can agree that being self employed has its benefits. It certainly negates a lot of the aforementioned caveats above. But to answer your question properly I think it needs to be done from two different perspectives - from a business angle and from a personal view.

Business - It would allow me to put my life and soul in to a business/brand/company where I could take it as far as I want. It would give me the flexibility to manage things the way I want them managed based on my outlook and ambitions. It would provide me an honest wage by providing a professional and high quality service. The workload I acquire and the hours I put in will be reflecting on my brand and not towards the corporate greed of a large company.

Personal - Satisfaction, Satisfaction, Satisfaction. Being able to stand back from the work you’ve done and see the results. The before and afters. Knowing that the work you’ve done has directly provided a good service to a customer. Waking up to start a hard shift with the knowledge that you don’t have X, Y and Z of business directors breathing down your neck. Knowing that all the time, effort and hard work you put in directly contributes to you and your business.

Hopefully that hasn’t came across as too verbose! But seeing as this is my first post on the forum, thought it only fair to give a bit more of a detailed answer.

Any feedback and help is welcomed ✌😎

👍

I can see you are serious. 

Being in employment has its benefits. Holiday pay, sick pay in most cases and sometimes a company car. When you become self employed you loose those perks. Yes you become your own boss with its freedoms, but you quickly find you are now carrying the responsibility of a business as well as the responsibility to provide a living for your family and yourself. In our case we are at the mercy of the weather - and a little less our customers.

This is a business you can afford to grow into. But its also an industry where a minor miscalculation can cost a lot of wasted resources. For example, many might feel that all they need is a small van and a small tank. So they go for a 250 liter tank and a Peugeot Bipper. Then they soon realise that they have outgrown the tank and the van they are paying off wouldn't carry much extra weight.

I already had a Suzuki Carry van when I started so opted for a trailer system. In the end I should have sold the Suzuki and purchased a bigger van from the beginning. The trailer lasted 3 years before it fell apart and the Suzuki wasn't any good as a van mount. But it was early days and there were only 2 of us wfp in the whole area. We didn't know what we were doing and learnt as we went along.

I believe you have to decide what field you want to start with and focus on that. However, that doesn't mean I'm right. It also doesn't mean to say I'm wrong. 🤔

@scottish cleaning service has recently started up and has his fingers in other 'related' pies such as pressure washing. Some window cleaners opt for commercial work as it pays better. Others like ourselves have a couple of commercial jobs but we mainly focus on domestic.Those who have focused on commercial have found their jobs cancelled or postponed these last few months. I believe that its good not to have all your eggs in one basket.

For me I should have purchased a swb Citroen Relay or equivalent from the outset and fitted it with a 650 liter tank for 2 operators.

I should have sold my 450gpd r/o and purchased a 4040 as soon as I realised I wasn't producing enough water to grow the business. I didn't.

The Citroen Relay is now scrap but served me well the 10 years I used it. I now have a swb Peugeot Boxer. I regret not going for a mwb or better still a lwb.

My son worked along with me but these days we work separately and work from separate vans. Even on my own I wouldn't go smaller than a 650 liter tank. Its always good to have plenty in reserve.

We process water into a 1000 ibc tank using a 4040 r/o in my garage at home. The r/o is on a float switch so automatically kicks on when water is taken from the tank. Setting it up like this was the only way I could guarantee water when there were 3 of us drawing water at different times.

The van is parked on the drive way so I can easily run an extension cable out to plug a charger in. In winter I also put an 800 watt heater in the back which I added a froststat to. It kicks on at 2 degrees C and off at around 5 degrees C.

There was some suppliers of good quality tanks around. Grippatank in the south is one. Daqua also supply and fit tanks in Scotland.

In the north we have Purefreedom who will design and fit a tank to your requirements. They use Wydale tanks. Some say they are terrible tanks due to poor baffling but my 650 liter tank has served me well.

My son was given a small window cleaning round to work as extra money over a weekend 16 years ago. When I lost my job in the motor trade I had no other choice but to develop this round as son wasn't motivated to do it. We also purchased a small round and converted it to wfp. Apart from that we did a little door knocking but most of our loyal customers came from our customers recommending us. This also means we can't slack for 1 minute.

My everyday pole is a Gardiner SLX22. I also have an old SLX40 (now SLX39) for those hard to reach windows. When son in law discontinued window cleaning 5 years ago he gave me a rather battered SLX22 back. I replace clamps on it and fitted a flocked brush for leaded windows. My son uses an SLX25 which does him for just about everything. He's taller than I am so this is a perfect length for him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
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Neil.. Lancashire
3 hours ago, TrixxyKicks said:

Hi Spruce, thanks for your reply.

I’ve previously read over both the threads you’ve highlighted, a lot of very good information in them and I’ve been delving in to every thread on this forum since I’ve joined.

I live in a soft water area, so the TDS is low. I appreciate I could rely on just a DI system but I was trying to find out if there’s any added benefit in an RO system or whether it would be unnecessary. Storing and producing water isn’t a problem.

In terms of building up a customer base I’ll be utilising every possible method available. A professional looking website and making sure it’s enabled to rank well on Google, all the social media platforms - Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube - flyers, networking, and of course door-to-door canvassing as well. I’ve also several ideas for a few guerrilla marketing options to get the name out there, something a bit more left field and out the box. Starting on a business I think you really need to aggressively market it and throw your time and energy into it in order to see the best return on it. Of course your standard of work, your image and reliability and so forth comes in to play as well, but the more you put in, the more you get back.

Your last question is a good and valid one, I question I think should be asked to anyone starting in any industry. Of course the answer will be subjective dependant on who you ask, but I feel it’s only fair to give you an entirely open and honest answer...

I come from a sales and business development background (for the most part). I’ve worked for many large corporate companies, managing multiple internal and external stakeholders, worked the 9-5, the 12-8, the 8-6, the 1-10, the 8-8, the 10-10 and so on. I give all my time and effort for the company I’m working for. I’m a hard worker, never late, always do the overtime and get paid a good wage for it. I’ve progressed a lot in my career and for a lot of people that would be sufficient - meandering along indoctrinated by the corporate world. If I close a sale, generate a lead or gain a new client (albeit I get paid a bonus for doing so) it’s the company which profits, not me. Working for large corporations, they very rarely congratulate you on your hard work, all the hours, all the sacrifices, all the pressure. However, on the contrary, they are very quick to highlight your mistakes and lost chances - where you went wrong.

Now I understand only too well that being self employed/having your own business isn’t all bells and whistles, and you’ve asked why window cleaning? Well... I think a lot of us can agree that being self employed has its benefits. It certainly negates a lot of the aforementioned caveats above. But to answer your question properly I think it needs to be done from two different perspectives - from a business angle and from a personal view.

Business - It would allow me to put my life and soul in to a business/brand/company where I could take it as far as I want. It would give me the flexibility to manage things the way I want them managed based on my outlook and ambitions. It would provide me an honest wage by providing a professional and high quality service. The workload I acquire and the hours I put in will be reflecting on my brand and not towards the corporate greed of a large company.

Personal - Satisfaction, Satisfaction, Satisfaction. Being able to stand back from the work you’ve done and see the results. The before and afters. Knowing that the work you’ve done has directly provided a good service to a customer. Waking up to start a hard shift with the knowledge that you don’t have X, Y and Z of business directors breathing down your neck. Knowing that all the time, effort and hard work you put in directly contributes to you and your business.

Hopefully that hasn’t came across as too verbose! But seeing as this is my first post on the forum, thought it only fair to give a bit more of a detailed answer.

Any feedback and help is welcomed ✌😎

Your talent's will be wasted in the window cleaning industry...

Have you thought about becoming a author 😀

Only joking.

So long as you don't mind the physical side you will be very successful with that approach.

All the best!!

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you want to buy the best van/system you can afford as its imperative you have a reliable van and system....ive spent £30k on my van,diesel hot water heater,electric reels and poles.....im a one man operator and find a 500L tank perfect for me as i only work 5 or 6 hours a day......

i did manage with old second hand vans,cheap DIY systems,trolleys,backpacks,inferior poles but as i built my business up and started to develop a much better paying round of customers i could afford to get something more professional and reliable which then allowed me a more efficient way of working....

 

you have the problem of not having any customer yet so forking out for a nice shiny sign written new van and decent set up might be out of reach for now....

 

best wishes...

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scottish cleaning service
54 minutes ago, dazmond said:

you want to buy the best van/system you can afford as its imperative you have a reliable van and system....ive spent £30k on my van,diesel hot water heater,electric reels and poles.....im a one man operator and find a 500L tank perfect for me as i only work 5 or 6 hours a day......

i did manage with old second hand vans,cheap DIY systems,trolleys,backpacks,inferior poles but as i built my business up and started to develop a much better paying round of customers i could afford to get something more professional and reliable which then allowed me a more efficient way of working....

 

you have the problem of not having any customer yet so forking out for a nice shiny sign written new van and decent set up might be out of reach for now....

 

best wishes...

I understand where you are coming from on the working day. I made a right few bob Monday on a roof clearing gutters, harness on and out the skylight. Finished early and no motivation to do anything else that day work wise. I felt i had made my money so no point chasing more. Must be the first time in my life I have came to that conclusion but it won't be the last. Some days I only make £100 but for 4hrs work i can't really complain. Working smart now seems to be my way forward and long may it continue. 😉

  • Like 2
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3 hours ago, Neil.. Lancashire said:

Your talent's will be wasted in the window cleaning industry...

Have you thought about becoming a author 😀

Only joking.

So long as you don't mind the physical side you will be very successful with that approach.

All the best!!

I think one of the biggest problems some people have becoming a window cleaner is that of self image.

In @TrixxyKicks' situation he is considering a change from a successful sales career dealing with top brass management to become a window cleaner; an occupation considered by someone as the bottom of the woodpile along side dustbin men.

If you really focus on developing the business there a better hourly rate than some earn in professional jobs. We've heard the odd experience of a poster saying that his customer refused the price as he wasn't going to pay a window cleaner more than he was earning.

Another thing to look into is licensing regulations for window cleaners in your area.

 

 

  • Like 1
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johnny bravo

there are a lot of newbies like yourself.     it will be hard to get work now canvassing,   a few here and there,     but you can get lucky and hit a area which needs a new windy   due to there last one finishing or just  got fed up and stopped.  You may want to buy some work to get you going.       you may buy new and not get enough work to keep you going .  I suggest getting a RO and seeing how you get on producing pure water.      When you master that you are good to go.   water accesability will play a big part in this.

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scottish cleaning service

I seen my first van that only does uPVC cleans today. Big demand for that but customers don't want to pay too much to get it done. Got a call Monday regarding full pvc clean on semi detached and i quoted £200 over the phone to give him an idea. I think he was expecting £40 or something around that price.

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Neil.. Lancashire
36 minutes ago, spruce said:

I think one of the biggest problems some people have becoming a window cleaner is that of self image.

In @TrixxyKicks' situation he is considering a change from a successful sales career dealing with top brass management to become a window cleaner; an occupation considered by someone as the bottom of the woodpile along side dustbin men.

If you really focus on developing the business there a better hourly rate than some earn in professional jobs. We've heard the odd experience of a poster saying that his customer refused the price as he wasn't going to pay a window cleaner more than he was earning.

Another thing to look into is licensing regulations for window cleaners in your area.

 

 

I so wish I had gotten in to window cleaning in my 20's.  Work hard to get it well established and your nearly set up for life. You can choose the hour's you work within reason while earning a great hourly rate. 

Outside in the fresh air...  Window cleaner have never had it so good!

Just need to put in the hard work at the beginning.

  • Agree 3
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55 minutes ago, Neil.. Lancashire said:

I so wish I had gotten in to window cleaning in my 20's.  Work hard to get it well established and your nearly set up for life. You can choose the hour's you work within reason while earning a great hourly rate. 

Outside in the fresh air...  Window cleaner have never had it so good!

Just need to put in the hard work at the beginning.

i did get into window cleaning in my 20s but never took it that serious...i was 22 and on ladders back then,scrimming windows!and lots of collecting!i spent a lot of money on drink,drugs,parties and women in those days....the rest i wasted........

so ive been window cleaning for 27 years now but its only over the last 10 years since i went WFP that ive really started to make decent money for the hours i work...esp the last 5 years...my round has gone from strength to strength.....

 

im certainly glad ive stuck at it all these years....im reaping the benefits now finally......i was young and foolish back in my twenties and early 30s but seemed to arrive in my 40s with a bit of wisdom and common sense that had been severely lacking in my younger years!.....

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Neil.. Lancashire
5 minutes ago, dazmond said:

i did get into window cleaning in my 20s but never took it that serious...i was 22 and on ladders back then,scrimming windows!and lots of collecting!i spent a lot of money on drink,drugs,parties and women in those days....the rest i wasted........

so ive been window cleaning for 27 years now but its only over the last 10 years since i went WFP that ive really started to make decent money for the hours i work...esp the last 5 years...my round has gone from strength to strength.....

 

im certainly glad ive stuck at it all these years....im reaping the benefits now finally......i was young and foolish back in my twenties and early 30s but seemed to arrive in my 40s with a bit of wisdom and common sense that had been severely lacking in my younger years!.....

spent a lot of money on drink,drugs,parties and women in those days....the rest i wasted........😂😂

The 90's were amazing!!  

Sounds like you did the longest apprenticeship ever.. 😂

You definitely deserve what you have got now..

Every credit for sticking it out. there must of been times when you thought about doing something different. 

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