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Uv light for chlorine


Baldmonkey

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Hi all, I know that carbon filters are the go to thing to remove chlorine to protect r/o membranes but will a uv light get rid of the chlorine too. Getting mixed messages on the net and wondered if anyone had any experience of this, ta

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17 minutes ago, Baldmonkey said:

Hi all, I know that carbon filters are the go to thing to remove chlorine to protect r/o membranes but will a uv light get rid of the chlorine too. Getting mixed messages on the net and wondered if anyone had any experience of this, ta

UVA is proven to kill off bacteria etc however do you really want to be mixing more electric around water and you will not get a guarantee that it's working over cartridges 

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8 hours ago, Apw1210 said:

UVA is proven to kill off bacteria etc however do you really want to be mixing more electric around water and you will not get a guarantee that it's working over cartridges 

The electricity side is simple, the uv lamps are designed specifically for external pond use so are fully water sealed. My system is home based to so unlike some people I don't drag around Prefilters, delicate ro membranes and resin all day for nothing. 

I know the uv sterilisation includes bacteria but am none the wiser with regards to chlorine. 

I wouldn't use it as a standalone chlorine eradication tool, more a helping hand for the carbon. 

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Just now, Baldmonkey said:

The electricity side is simple, the uv lamps are designed specifically for external pond use so are fully water sealed. My system is home based to so unlike some people I don't drag around Prefilters, delicate ro membranes and resin all day for nothing. 

I know the uv sterilisation includes bacteria but am none the wiser with regards to chlorine. 

I wouldn't use it as a standalone chlorine eradication tool, more a helping hand for the carbon. 

I know what UV purification is. 

UV can in theory actually remove the need for carbon block and reverse osmosis however you would require a larger Reactor to ensure the process is successful 

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Very interesting.. 

Apparently the UV turns the free chlorine into hydrochloric acid. I was wondering if that would be bad for the membranes but just read this:

"Many water treatment systems include RO units, which commonly use thin-film composite membranes because of their greater efficiency. However, these membranes cannot tolerate much chlorine, so locating the UV unit upstream of the RO can effectively dechlorinate the water, eliminating or greatly reducing the need for neutralizing chemicals or GAC filters."

Seems like a good idea. 

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4 minutes ago, Skxawng said:

Very interesting.. 

Apparently the UV turns the free chlorine into hydrochloric acid. I was wondering if that would be bad for the membranes but just read this:

"Many water treatment systems include RO units, which commonly use thin-film composite membranes because of their greater efficiency. However, these membranes cannot tolerate much chlorine, so locating the UV unit upstream of the RO can effectively dechlorinate the water, eliminating or greatly reducing the need for neutralizing chemicals or GAC filters."

Seems like a good idea. 

Interesting, i haven't noticed strong sunlight turning the free chlorine in my swimming pool water into acid. 😮

I think the biggest problem would be exposing the water to strong enough UV for long enough.

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To the best if my knowledge uv will, kill bacteria but not affect chlorine in our application , I have a customer who is a chemical scientist I will ask him when I next see him .

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35 minutes ago, Baldmonkey said:

just found this interesting snippet

As an alternative to the use of chemicals and activated carbon beds, UV technology can be utilized to safely destroy chlorine and chloramines present in water.

https://www.aquafineuv.com/Chlorines-Chloramines-Destruction#:~:text=As an alternative to the,and chloramines present in water.

I think this type of system would be used in factories on large scale operations not on our type of systems , ionics use a uv clarifier but still use carbon filters to remove chlorine if theses filters would remove it I doubt they would still be recommending them they would be saying that there filtration is so good they arnt needed 

I stand to be corrected with what I have said but am 100% sure about ionics and what they do , it’s an interesting subject .

Edited by Pjj
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