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Storing Equipment and water


P4dstar

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I'm about to move house. I currently have a brick built garage where I keep my IBC and all my window cleaning kit. Its shared with the kids bikes etc currently. When we move the house doesn't have a garage, just a very narrow outbuilding that isn't wide enough for the IBC (It also wouldn't fit through the door) that will be used for the kids bikes etc.

I'm looking at sheds etc, there is a long lead time with most manufacturers for delivery and we should be moving in circa 6 weeks time. The structure will solely be for window cleaning so just needs to store my IBC, a set of shelves, my RO and spare poles. Any ideas or advice gratefully received as always.

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20 minutes ago, P4dstar said:

I'm about to move house. I currently have a brick built garage where I keep my IBC and all my window cleaning kit. Its shared with the kids bikes etc currently. When we move the house doesn't have a garage, just a very narrow outbuilding that isn't wide enough for the IBC (It also wouldn't fit through the door) that will be used for the kids bikes etc.

I'm looking at sheds etc, there is a long lead time with most manufacturers for delivery and we should be moving in circa 6 weeks time. The structure will solely be for window cleaning so just needs to store my IBC, a set of shelves, my RO and spare poles. Any ideas or advice gratefully received as always.

I picked up a 2nd hand shed for £20, decent condition, railway sleepers were heavy as ****, which it stands on, but me and me mate assembled in about an hour. A lot of people  just want shot of them so you can pick up a good deal. One of my sisters has moved out near your area, cinderford. keep meaning to visit and check out her local pubs, when she lived in stroud I drove over in an old rover metro had at the time and it barely got up the hills 😂

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2 hours ago, ks789 said:

I picked up a 2nd hand shed for £20, decent condition, railway sleepers were heavy as ****, which it stands on, but me and me mate assembled in about an hour. A lot of people  just want shot of them so you can pick up a good deal. One of my sisters has moved out near your area, cinderford. keep meaning to visit and check out her local pubs, when she lived in stroud I drove over in an old rover metro had at the time and it barely got up the hills 😂

Haha you’re not wrong on the hills man, I’ve a few jobs up hills you genuinely wouldn’t believe we’re passable. I’ve learned quickly which ones to go to at the end of the day when the tank is empty 😂 genuinely thought I’d f**ked my clutch on one, the smell getting up he hill was horrendous!

 

Not sure on the second hand shed. It’s going to be a business expense because it’s solely for business use so I don’t mind investing in it. I’m considering a ship lap timber treated shed. Then adding a waterproof lining and insulation. Plasterboard the walls, tile the floor and add a sealed skirting board for when it inevitably gets wet inside. That should allow me to add a radiator and protect my RO from frost damage over the winter. I reckon if I get something big enough for 2 IBC’s and reinforce the floor it could last a long time. I’m not the greatest at these things so thought I’d seek advice first though.

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Get a pressure treated one as it will last a lot longer. Plasterboard might not be best as if gets wet it will just fall apart. You could either use upvc cladding or 'bathroom panels'. I'm not sure how best to get a shed with a floor strong enough to take an ibc or 2. Ideally insulate the floor under the tank as well. 

Might be worth insulating floor, then marine plywood, maybe even fibreglass the floor with a lower exit at the door.

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19 minutes ago, ched999uk said:

Get a pressure treated one as it will last a lot longer. Plasterboard might not be best as if gets wet it will just fall apart. You could either use upvc cladding or 'bathroom panels'. I'm not sure how best to get a shed with a floor strong enough to take an ibc or 2. Ideally insulate the floor under the tank as well. 

Might be worth insulating floor, then marine plywood, maybe even fibreglass the floor with a lower exit at the door.

Thats the kind of advice I was hoping for. Thanks man. Marine ply would work a treat. I might actually fibreglass the entire floor and up the sides with a small gradient to a drainage pipe. I wonder if protectakote would bond to fibreglass to give the floor some grip? Adding a lot of extra supports should sort the weight issue I think.

I'm starting to wonder if I could work with the IBC under a tarp for a few weeks while I build my own unit at the weekends. For what I'd pay for a decent shed I could build the frame from thicker posts and add UPVC windows and something like corotile on the roof instead of felt.

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Why don't you just get a couple of 400 litre upright tanks and fit them in the out house. Chances are nothing is going to freeze up in the outhouse.

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1 hour ago, P4dstar said:

I’m considering a ship lap timber treated shed.

Shiplap =  💩 don't be tempted get a well made shed with tongue and groove boards get it from a local supplier if you can and ask if they can treat the underside of the floor before they deliver it, a decent supplier will use Barrettine wood preserver or similar then give it 2 coats of this stuff, foil bubble wrap insulation from screwfix which has the same insulation properties as standard loft insulation, the shed could be placed on sleepers or decking boards a decent local supplier will be able to sort you out with those as well, mine is on paving then decking boards,

You could have an outdoor socket fitted at side or back of the house then run a cable from that socket and set up another outdoor socket in your shed for your booster pump, it will depend on where you are putting the shed in terms of distance from the house you can put the cable in trench under the lawn inside plastic pipe and get some push fittings and elbows from screwfix.

 

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7 minutes ago, Iron Giant said:

foil bubble wrap insulation from screwfix which has the same insulation properties as standard loft insulation

Is that stuff any good in real life? I looked at it a few times as it seems very thin and easy to fit but it almost seems too good to be true?

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As for a base I have seen concrete fence posts used at 90 degrees to floor 'joists'. Then staple dpc strips (Damp proof course membrane) to the floor joists so moisture can't creep through the concrete posts to the floor timbers. Make sure you dont allow the dpc to stick out so rain could fall on it and run along it to soak the timbers. Hope that makes sense?

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23 minutes ago, THL4KEL said:

Why don't you just get a couple of 400 litre upright tanks and fit them in the out house. Chances are nothing is going to freeze up in the outhouse.

Its is tight in there, just not worth the hassle to be honest man. It's better for the bikes and mower, it's not even 1m deep and about 3m wide. If I build my own I will probably put the RO up on the wall in there till its done though.

17 minutes ago, Iron Giant said:

Shiplap =  💩 don't be tempted get a well made shed with tongue and groove boards get it from a local supplier if you can and ask if they can treat the underside of the floor before they deliver it, a decent supplier will use Barrettine wood preserver or similar then give it 2 coats of this stuff, foil bubble wrap insulation from screwfix which has the same insulation properties as standard loft insulation, the shed could be placed on sleepers or decking boards a decent local supplier will be able to sort you out with those as well, mine is on paving then decking boards,

You could have an outdoor socket fitted at side or back of the house then run a cable from that socket and set up another outdoor socket in your shed for your booster pump, it will depend on where you are putting the shed in terms of distance from the house you can put the cable in trench under the lawn inside plastic pipe and get some push fittings and elbows from screwfix.

 

I've literally only just learned the difference between overlap and shiplap... Now you've forced me to learn tongue and groove 😂

I'm leaning towards making it myself, but it seems that could all be applied easily enough. If it works out and is warm enough I'll make another for my son to live in when he comes back from Uni 😂😆🤣

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2 minutes ago, ched999uk said:

Is that stuff any good in real life? I looked at it a few times as it seems very thin and easy to fit but it almost seems too good to be true?

A mate of mine had a similar foil to what Screwfix supply fitted when they had their loft conversion done he knows his stuff and has been very happy with the insulation properties, I can't fault mine as I have my shed out without 2 years ago just bought a cheap stapler and did my shed in no time at all, 

They can't sell something and claim for it to be as good as fibreglass insulation otherwise they would have major backlash. 

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6 minutes ago, ched999uk said:

As for a base I have seen concrete fence posts used at 90 degrees to floor 'joists'. Then staple dpc strips (Damp proof course membrane) to the floor joists so moisture can't creep through the concrete posts to the floor timbers. Make sure you dont allow the dpc to stick out so rain could fall on it and run along it to soak the timbers. Hope that makes sense?

Thats a decent shout, makes perfect sense man. Its going to go down on a purpose made concrete base. There are currently paving slabs there but they don't look particularly level.

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4 minutes ago, P4dstar said:

I'm leaning towards making it myself, but it seems that could all be applied easily enough.

if you have the skills mate, fellas down the allotments have built sheds and big pigeon cree's from osb board and they are solid, 

Old outhouses can be stone cold in the winter, I used to rent a prefab concrete garage years ago and the water in containers used to have ice in them after a really cold night in winter 

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Master Jedi Alejandro
36 minutes ago, P4dstar said:

I'm leaning towards making it myself, but it seems that could all be applied easily enough. If it works out and is warm enough I'll make another for my son to live in when he comes back from Uni 😂😆🤣

Careful, you may end up stumbling belong a new hobby! 😁

P4dstar 2 Years from now: "I'm building a new home and wondering if anyone has any experience installing 1000l IBC tanks in the basement?"

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2 hours ago, Iron Giant said:

if you have the skills mate, fellas down the allotments have built sheds and big pigeon cree's from osb board and they are solid, 

Old outhouses can be stone cold in the winter, I used to rent a prefab concrete garage years ago and the water in containers used to have ice in them after a really cold night in winter 

I can confirm I do not have the skills... I do however have enough money to buy a mitre saw and an iPad that can access YouTube 😂 And when you think about it just over 3 years ago I didn't have the skills to clean windows either so I'm sure I can work it out 🤔

1 hour ago, Master Jedi Alejandro said:

Careful, you may end up stumbling belong a new hobby! 😁

P4dstar 2 Years from now: "I'm building a new home and wondering if anyone has any experience installing 1000l IBC tanks in the basement?"

Project number two will be the garden bar. Under a lean to gazebo at the end of the garden.... baby steps though, baby steps.

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1 minute ago, ched999uk said:

Think you will need to start a build thread 🙂  So we can all see how it's done.

I'll make a video... There might be some swearing 🤣

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I would do the same again as I did last year. I built a lean to shed onto the side of the garage. Although, my tank is in the garage because I had limited space for the shed in the position I wanted to build it, between the house and the garage. The garage is quite a reasonable size to accommodate the tank.  I process in the shed and pipe the water across the rafters of the garage to the IBC. I fitted a washing machine, dryer and freezer under a worktop in the shed and I store my kayaking gear: wetsuits, life jackets, thermals etc) in there on hangers.

In your case, I would make sure the floor is solid. Firm slabs or concrete would be my choice due to dampness, rot and rodents. I would avoid wood at ground level except for the sides and the framing. I would position the tank first on interlocking rubber matting and build the shed around it. Would you be able to build it a bit bigger to fit equipment, utilities, garden or sports gear in there as well as processing and tank? Now is the time to be thinking and doing mental rehearsal. I'd build the shed then finish the rubber flooring. Making sure as has already been pointed out to you that there's no way for water ingress on the flooring. I personally would avoid ply or reconstituted wood. Except for good quality ply and felt for the roof. I would use tongue and groove timber for the walls. Double sided foil and bubble wrap would make a great insulation, is cheap, easy to use and is totally impervious to dampness. Bring an electric and a water supply in and fit some plugs and lighting. Get a small thermostatic tube heater to prevent the equipment freezing and away you go. Be mindful of making it easy to transfer water to your van tank, so fairly close to the van if you can.

You cannot over think this project. Take your time, think it through. Do it once. Do it big enough. Do it right. You could go to a garden centre that sells sheds. Take some photos and measurements on the sly for ideas. I'd20200823_182937.thumb.jpg.6fde77327e8589ac71667a6b3d024163.jpg build your shed to a much heavier standard for longevity.

Mine needs a bit of finishing on the gutter and a couple of other bits and it needs painting. I hope to have it all done before the winter.

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11 hours ago, Davy G said:

I would do the same again as I did last year. I built a lean to shed onto the side of the garage. Although, my tank is in the garage because I had limited space for the shed in the position I wanted to build it, between the house and the garage. The garage is quite a reasonable size to accommodate the tank.  I process in the shed and pipe the water across the rafters of the garage to the IBC. I fitted a washing machine, dryer and freezer under a worktop in the shed and I store my kayaking gear: wetsuits, life jackets, thermals etc) in there on hangers.

In your case, I would make sure the floor is solid. Firm slabs or concrete would be my choice due to dampness, rot and rodents. I would avoid wood at ground level except for the sides and the framing. I would position the tank first on interlocking rubber matting and build the shed around it. Would you be able to build it a bit bigger to fit equipment, utilities, garden or sports gear in there as well as processing and tank? Now is the time to be thinking and doing mental rehearsal. I'd build the shed then finish the rubber flooring. Making sure as has already been pointed out to you that there's no way for water ingress on the flooring. I personally would avoid ply or reconstituted wood. Except for good quality ply and felt for the roof. I would use tongue and groove timber for the walls. Double sided foil and bubble wrap would make a great insulation, is cheap, easy to use and is totally impervious to dampness. Bring an electric and a water supply in and fit some plugs and lighting. Get a small thermostatic tube heater to prevent the equipment freezing and away you go. Be mindful of making it easy to transfer water to your van tank, so fairly close to the van if you can.

You cannot over think this project. Take your time, think it through. Do it once. Do it big enough. Do it right. You could go to a garden centre that sells sheds. Take some photos and measurements on the sly for ideas. I'd20200823_182937.thumb.jpg.6fde77327e8589ac71667a6b3d024163.jpg build your shed to a much heavier standard for longevity.

Mine needs a bit of finishing on the gutter and a couple of other bits and it needs painting. I hope to have it all done before the winter.

Thats ace man. I did think about a solid floor, perhaps repaving the area and removing the shed base, just the frame on the floor, is that what you mean? I can't see a supporting wooden frame underneath yours?

If its an apex shed I'm trying to work out if the wooden frame needs the support of the wooden floor to help hold it together. No one has a direct answer to that anywhere, I found one guy suggesting it would twist in the wind. The only direct solution I found was to use fence post like timer as the outer frame and secure them into a concrete base on the four corners, that doesn't seem wise.

In terms of positioning it's gonna be within a couple of metres of the back gate but I'll have to make some adaptations to the current set up as the water is currently only 1m away from the van, thats easy enough though.

 

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50 minutes ago, P4dstar said:

Thats ace man. I did think about a solid floor, perhaps repaving the area and removing the shed base, just the frame on the floor, is that what you mean? I can't see a supporting wooden frame underneath yours?

If its an apex shed I'm trying to work out if the wooden frame needs the support of the wooden floor to help hold it together. No one has a direct answer to that anywhere, I found one guy suggesting it would twist in the wind. The only direct solution I found was to use fence post like timer as the outer frame and secure them into a concrete base on the four corners, that doesn't seem wise.

In terms of positioning it's gonna be within a couple of metres of the back gate but I'll have to make some adaptations to the current set up as the water is currently only 1m away from the van, thats easy enough though.

 

Yep build a a frame directly on the slabs using 65mm x 45mm treated framing timber laid flat. As long as the frame is joined to make one continuous, connected frame, right round, that's all you need. Build the rest of the framing up of of this using the same timber, finishing with a frame around the top for the roof, and rafters across to support the roof. Fence post timber is far too big. Make the shed to a size that will make best use of the length the t&g timber comes in, to reduce waste and save money. If you can build against a wall or fence that will add even more strength and save you some money.

Edited by Davy G
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